Photographs by Frank

24 October 2015

Sachuest Point & Second Beach

Filed under: Autumn,Birds,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 11:30 AM

Last Wednesday evening I judged the nature competition at the Hockomock Digital Photographers club. I left the house early that morning and headed for the Sachuest National Wildlife Refuge in Middletown, Rhode Island.

I was hoping (but not expecting, since it is early in the season) to photograph diving ducks (including Harlequins) that winter in the waters off Sachuest Point. There were surprisingly few ducks. I saw a single female Common Eider and a single American Black Duck; that was it. The ledges off the east side of the point held a couple of dozen double-crested cormorants. And, of course,  gulls, mostly herring gulls, were ever present.

On land, the most common bird, by far, were migrating yellow-rump warblers; there were dozens of them. Two different types of sparrows (also migrants?) were also common along the edges of the walking paths.

I had seen groups of small birds at the surf’s edge on Second Beach on my way out to the point. They were still there when I stopped after spending a few hours at the NWR. I spent more than an hour photographing sandpipers as they foraged at the waters edge.

These birds are a never-ending source of entertainment as they scurry about trying to avoid the waves, dogs and people while pausing intermittently to forage for a morsel of food.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Yellow Rumped Warbler #1
Yellow Rumped Warbler #1
Yellow Rumped Warbler #2
Yellow Rumped Warbler #2
Yellow Rumped Warbler #3
Yellow Rumped Warbler #3
Sparrow
Sparrow
Semipalmated Sandpiper #1
Semipalmated Sandpiper #1
Semipalmated Sandpiper #2
Semipalmated Sandpiper #2
Semipalmated Sandpiper #3
Semipalmated Sandpiper #3
Semipalmated Sandpiper #4
Semipalmated Sandpiper #4
Semipalmated Sandpiper #5
Semipalmated Sandpiper #5
Semipalmated Sandpiper #6
Semipalmated Sandpiper #6
Semipalmated Sandpiper #7
Semipalmated Sandpiper #7
Semipalmated Sandpipers
Semipalmated Sandpipers

 

19 October 2015

Autumnal Abstracts 2015 — Redux

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , , — Frank @ 1:30 PM

About two weeks ago, I made my first batch of Autumnal Abstracts for the 2015 season.

Since then, I have ventured out on a few more excursions in search of the ‘proper’ scenes from which to extract more abstractions.

All but the last photograph made using a long exposure (in the range of 6-12 seconds) and deliberate movement of the camera. The only ‘photoshopping’ done to these photos is the processing typically applied to raw files from the camera (i.e. levels adjustment, contrast, etc.).

Many of these are much more abstract than the previous photographs in this series, in that they do not really have any trace of their origin remaining. I would be interested in hearing folks reaction to these photographs.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #1
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #1
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #2
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #2
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #3
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #3
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #4
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #4
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #5
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #5
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #6
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #6
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #7
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #7
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #8
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #8
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #9
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #9
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #10
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #10
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #11
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #11
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #12
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #12
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #13
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #13
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #14
Autumnal Abstract 2015 #14

 

First Snow

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , , — Frank @ 1:00 PM

All of a sudden it is seemingly winter!

The foliage is definitely past peak and Saturday night we got about an inch of snow. Sunday dawned cold (the high for the day was 39 oF) and sunny. The sun made quick work of most of the snow. By the time we (Joan, her friend Sally, and I) headed out to hike the Bailey Brook loop in the early afternoon it was mostly gone.

However, during the couple of hours we were out, the clouds moved in and we experienced three or four periods of snow showers and flurries. The combination of colorful leaves on the ground and traces of fresh snow made for some interesting photography.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Season's First Snow #1
Season's First Snow #1
Season's First Snow #2
Season's First Snow #2
Season's First Snow #3
Season's First Snow #3
Season's First Snow #4
Season's First Snow #4
Season's First Snow #5
Season's First Snow #5
Season's First Snow #6
Season's First Snow #6
Season's First Snow #7
Season's First Snow #7
Bailey Brook Falls (detail)
Bailey Brook Falls (detail)

 

13 October 2015

Autumn Foliage — 2015

Filed under: Autumn — Tags: , , — Frank @ 2:00 PM

Last week, I took drives on three different days in search of autumn foliage to photograph. Finding the ideal combination of foliage and light (both quality and direction are important) is not trivial.

Last Wednesday (the 7th) the foliage in our ‘neighborhood’ was good, but not yet peak. Thus, I decided to head north. I meandered as far as Rumney, NH before turning around in the late afternoon. The weather was not completely cooperative but I made a few nice photos before the clouds moved in.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Autumn Wetland (Hillsborough, NH)
Autumn Wetland (Hillsborough, NH)
Farrar Marsh (Hillsborough, NH)
Farrar Marsh  (Hillsborough, NH)
Gile Pond (N. Sutton, NH) - 1:30 PM
Gile Pond (N. Sutton, NH) - 1:30 PM
Gile Pond (N. Sutton, NH) - 6:30 PM
Gile Pond (N. Sutton, NH) - 6:30 PM

 

Friday (the 9th) dawned foggy and rainy. I took the camera with me and after finishing my errands, I wandered the back roads on the way home looking for interesting photographs.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Wall of 'Fire' #1
Wall of 'Fire' #1
Contoocook River Bend in Autumn
Contoocook River Bend in Autumn
Bend in the Road in Autumn
Bend in the Road in Autumn
Autumn Wetland in the Rain
Autumn Wetland in the Rain

 

Saturday (the 10th), I took an indirect route (via South Newbury, Bradford and Washington) home after I finished photographing the meeting house in South Sutton.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #1
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #1
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #2
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #2
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #3
Wetland in Autumn (Bradford, NH) #3
Autumn Foliage (detail)
Autumn Foliage (detail)
Wetland in Autumn (Washington, NH)
Wetland in Autumn (Washington, NH)
Autumn Foliage (Half Moon Pond, Washington, NH)
Autumn Foliage (Half Moon Pond, Washington, NH)

 

South Sutton Meeting House Et Alia

Filed under: Autumn — Frank @ 1:30 PM

Countless times over the years decades*, I have driven by the meeting house in South Sutton, NH.

Every time I drive past I say to myself…”That’s pretty. I should come back  and photograph it some time.”

Well, this past Saturday was finally “some time”!

The day dawned with a high, light overcast… perfect for photographing white buildings. I was hoping for a bit of autumn foliage to frame the building. (I was planning a color photograph.)

Making this photograph was more difficult than I anticipated. Not wanting to trespass in the neighbors yard and not wanting to include power lines in the frame severely limited the angles from which one could actually make a photograph.

The good news is that within sight of the meeting house are two other interesting buildings to photograph. There is an old school house just behind the meeting house and there is an old store (which appears to be a museum now) just across the road. I had no inkling about these until I stopped on Saturday.  I spent much more time photographing the store than I did on the meeting house.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
South Sutton Meeting House
South Sutton Meeting House
South Sutton School House
South Sutton School House
G,G, Wells Store
G,G, Wells Store
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #1
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #1
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #2
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #2
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #3
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #3
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #4
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #4
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #5
G,G, Wells Store - Detail #5

*Joan and I used to drive through Sutton and past this meeting house on our way between Hanover and Antrim back in the late 1970’s.


 

Autumnal Abstracts Et Alia

Filed under: Autumn — Tags: , , — Frank @ 1:00 PM

It has been about two weeks since I last posted here. I have been busy… photographing! Thus this should be the first in a series of posts in rapid succession that will ‘catch me up’.

A week ago*, I took a late afternoon walk on the un-maintained section of Brimstone Corner Road. Newly fallen leaves were just beginning to accumulate on the ground and I was inspired to add to my collection of Autumnal Abstracts that I began about this time last year. (Also included are a couple of other less abstract photos made in the same time frame. Thus the ‘et al.’.)

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Stone Wall with Fallen Trunk
Stone Wall with Fallen Trunk
Maple and Granite
Maple and Granite
Autumn Flow
Autumn Flow
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #1
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #1
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #2
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #2
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #3
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #3
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #4
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #4
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #5
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #5
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #6
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #6
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #7
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #7
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #8
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #8
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #9
Autumnal Abstract 2015 - #9

* Tues. 6 Oct to be exact.


 

29 September 2015

A Long Weekend at Star Island

Filed under: Autumn,Birds,Landscapes — Tags: , , , , — Frank @ 11:00 PM

Last Friday afternoon we boarded the M/V Thomas Leighton and headed to Star Island for a birding weekend organized by Eric Masterson. This trip is timed to be able to see southward migrating birds, especially warblers*. We arrived back on the mainland about 3:30 PM on Sunday.

Saturday dawned blustery and although there were birds present, they were pretty much hunkered down inside the brush and therefore impossible to photograph. The wind died down on Saturday evening and Sunday was much calmer and the photography more productive.

I discovered that (compared to the spring time) photography was much more difficult since most of the plants which were bare in the spring were still more-or-less fully leafed out. Thus getting clear views of small birds was difficult.

The most common warbler we saw, by far, was the yellow-rumped. In addition we observed two rarities for New Hampshire… a lark sparrow and a lazuli bunting; both are western birds. The bunting is the first sighting of this species in NH (if it is accepted by the Rare Bird Committee).

Anyway, without further excuses or ado, here are the photos:

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Pine Warbler
Pine Warbler
ID Needed
ID Needed
Immature American Robin
Immature American Robin
Yellow-rumped Warbler #1
Yellow-rumped Warbler #1
Yellow-rumped Warbler #2
Yellow-rumped Warbler #2
Grey Catbird
Grey Catbird
Lark Sparrow #1
Lark Sparrow #1
Song Sparrow #1
Song Sparrow #1
Lark Sparrow #2
Lark Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #2
Blackpoll Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Northern Flicker
Northern Flicker

Another difference between our spring trip and this one, was the number of people. The spring trip occurred before the official opening of the season so the only people on the island were the maintenance staff and a couple of dozen birders. This past weekend us birders shared the island with at least three other groups… the Star Island board of directors, sailors participating in the Gosport Regatta and a group of kite fliers.

I took time away from birding on Saturday afternoon to photograph the sailboats as they neared Star Island (both the windward mark and the finish line were close by).

Here are the sailing photos:

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
J Boats in Close Quarters #1
J Boats in Close Quarters #1
Neck in Neck
Neck in Neck
Headed for the Home Stretch
Headed for the Home Stretch
Taking on a Big "Guy"
Taking on a Big
Rounding the Windward Mark #1
Rounding the Windward Mark #1
Headed for the Finish Line
Headed for the Finish Line
Rounding the Windward Mark #2
Rounding the Windward Mark #2

The sunset on Friday night was spectacular. Here are a few photos of that and a mishmash of other subjects:

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Star Island Sunset
Star Island Sunset
Sunset with Photographer
Sunset with Photographer
Summer House Sunset
Summer House Sunset
Star Island Kites
Star Island Kites
Gosport Chapel, Star Island
Gosport Chapel, Star Island
Art Barn (detail), Star Island
Art Barn (detail), Star Island
White Island Light at Dawn
White Island Light at Dawn

* We participated in a similar trip, timed for the spring migration, in May of 2014; see this post and this one for the details.

 

9 September 2015

Solitary Sandpipers

Filed under: Autumn,Birds,Monadnock Region,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 11:00 PM

The Monadnock Paper Mill in Bennington has drawn down the water level in Powdermill Pond so that they can work on their dam. This has exposed large expanses of mudflats. The last time this happened (according to the Fall newsletter from the Harris Center*) thirteen species of shorebird were found using this temporary habitat during the Fall migration.

This afternoon, I headed over to the NH Fish and Wildlife boat launch in Greenfield to see what was around. As I was standing on the boat ramp (which ends a good thirty feet from the nearest bit of water), I saw four peeps come in for a landing on the flats and promptly lost them. They really blend in well!

I shouldered the tripod and Big Bertha and headed over closer to where they landed. By the time I got the tripod set up at kneeling height, one of the peeps showed itself at the waters edge.  I spent the next hour watching six solitary sandpipers “do their thing”. (I’m not sure if the additional two where already there or if they flew in and I did not notice.)

The birds spent most of the time foraging and twice I saw dragonfly nymphs being consumed. There was also some bathing and preening activity.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Solitary Sandpiper #1
Solitary Sandpiper #1
Solitary Sandpiper Foraging #1
Solitary Sandpiper Foraging #1
Solitary Sandpiper #2
Solitary Sandpiper #2
Solitary Sandpiper Foraging #2
Solitary Sandpiper Foraging #2
Solitary Sandpiper with Prey
Solitary Sandpiper with Prey
Solitary Sandpiper Bathing
Solitary Sandpiper Bathing

* Eric Masterson from the Harris Center will be leading a trip to Powdermill Pond on 16 Sept. to look for shore birds; check out the Harris Center calendar for details.


 

2 November 2014

Gregg Lake Sunset

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:00 PM

Last Tuesday afternoon, I was headed out to photograph the water in Great Brook (the outlet of Gregg Lake) for my “Flow” project. I packed up and headed back up the lake road towards home just in time to witness a spectacular sunset… good thing I still had some extra space on my memory card!

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Gregg Lake Sunset #1
Gregg Lake Sunset #1
Gregg Lake Sunset #2
Gregg Lake Sunset #2
Gregg Lake Sunset #3
Gregg Lake Sunset #3
Gregg Lake Sunset #4
Gregg Lake Sunset #4

 

29 October 2014

Puddles of Sky

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 9:00 PM

Sunday afternoon, I made a right at the end of our driveway and walked up the un-maintained section of Brimstone Corner Road.

My plan was to make photographs of the yellow foliage (mainly beech) of the forest understory.

However, I got distracted by the reflections in the puddles left over from last week’s rain.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Puddle of Sky #1
Puddle of Sky #1
Puddle of Sky #2
Puddle of Sky #2
Puddle of Sky #3
Puddle of Sky #3
Puddle of Sky #4
Puddle of Sky #4
Puddle of Sky #5
Puddle of Sky #5
Puddle of Sky #6
Puddle of Sky #6
Puddle of Sky #7
Puddle of Sky #7
Puddle of Sky #8
Puddle of Sky #8

Despite the distraction, I did make a few photographs of the foliage along the way.

About a mile up Brimstone Corner Road from the house, one comes to a “T” intersection that is actually in Hancock; this intersection is “Brimstone Corner”. A small stream is carried under the road here in a stone culvert that I would guess to be somewhere between 150 and 200 years old.

I have been meaning to try to photograph this culvert and made a first attempt on this trip.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Roadside Foliage #1
Roadside Foliage #1
Roadside Foliage #2
Roadside Foliage #2
Maple Leaves
Maple Leaves
Stone Culvert at Brimstone Corner
Stone Culvert at Brimstone Corner
Lakeside Reflection
Lakeside Reflection

 

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Powered by WordPress