Photographs by Frank

11 November 2014

November Skies

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,November — Tags: , — Frank @ 10:00 PM

November is a slow time for me photographically. The hillsides, devoid of foliage, are an unphotogenic grey and the weather, in our neck of the woods, is often cold and grey. Today was NOT one of those days!

The temperature was in the high 50’s and it was partly sunny with wonderfully photographic clouds during much of the day. I made the photos shown below while running errands in the early afternoon.

I intended to head out again in the late afternoon expecting a good sunset. However, about 3:30 (sunset is about 4:30) the overcast rolled in and despite some ribbing from Joan and I did not bother to get out of the recliner!

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Gregg Lake
Gregg Lake
Birch Pond #1
Birch Pond #1
Birch Pond #2
Birch Pond #2

 

2 November 2014

Gregg Lake Sunset

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:00 PM

Last Tuesday afternoon, I was headed out to photograph the water in Great Brook (the outlet of Gregg Lake) for my “Flow” project. I packed up and headed back up the lake road towards home just in time to witness a spectacular sunset… good thing I still had some extra space on my memory card!

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Gregg Lake Sunset #1
Gregg Lake Sunset #1
Gregg Lake Sunset #2
Gregg Lake Sunset #2
Gregg Lake Sunset #3
Gregg Lake Sunset #3
Gregg Lake Sunset #4
Gregg Lake Sunset #4

 

29 October 2014

Puddles of Sky

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 9:00 PM

Sunday afternoon, I made a right at the end of our driveway and walked up the un-maintained section of Brimstone Corner Road.

My plan was to make photographs of the yellow foliage (mainly beech) of the forest understory.

However, I got distracted by the reflections in the puddles left over from last week’s rain.

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Puddle of Sky #1
Puddle of Sky #1
Puddle of Sky #2
Puddle of Sky #2
Puddle of Sky #3
Puddle of Sky #3
Puddle of Sky #4
Puddle of Sky #4
Puddle of Sky #5
Puddle of Sky #5
Puddle of Sky #6
Puddle of Sky #6
Puddle of Sky #7
Puddle of Sky #7
Puddle of Sky #8
Puddle of Sky #8

Despite the distraction, I did make a few photographs of the foliage along the way.

About a mile up Brimstone Corner Road from the house, one comes to a “T” intersection that is actually in Hancock; this intersection is “Brimstone Corner”. A small stream is carried under the road here in a stone culvert that I would guess to be somewhere between 150 and 200 years old.

I have been meaning to try to photograph this culvert and made a first attempt on this trip.

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Roadside Foliage #1
Roadside Foliage #1
Roadside Foliage #2
Roadside Foliage #2
Maple Leaves
Maple Leaves
Stone Culvert at Brimstone Corner
Stone Culvert at Brimstone Corner
Lakeside Reflection
Lakeside Reflection

 

20 October 2014

Signs of the Times

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — Frank @ 10:01 PM

The citizens of  New Hampshire take their politics seriously… even in the mid-term elections. This is probably because we really hew to the idea that all politics are local!

There are road side signs every where as candidates work on their “name recognition”. In some places one passes a lonely singleton in some one’s yard or along an isolated stretch of road. In other places there are great masses of signs concentrated in a small area. The first photo (below) shows the lineup of signs by our local market in Antrim.

Since we do not watch television (or listen to commercial radio) I can only imagine the onslaught of political advertising that viewers/listeners are enduring. Clearly, from the sign at one nearby fire station, the barrage has been too much for at least one individual!

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Political SIgns
Political SIgns
Reaction
Reaction

 

Last Call for Autumn Landscapes (for this year, at least)

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 10:00 PM

Foliage season here in the Monadnock region is finally winding down. The season began early with the swamp maples turning in late August,  For the past week or so the landscape has been dominated with the yellow-browns of the oaks and beeches, although one still finds a splash of the reds and oranges of the maples here and there.

It has been a good season!

I have taken to driving the back roads (rather than the “numbered routes” as I go about my errands. I stop when see a possibility for a good photograph and try not to be late for scheduled appointments! All of these photos were made in the past 10 days or so.

I am having trouble deciding which of the two photos of the barn I prefer. Likewise, I am torn between the horizontal and the vertical compositions that I have titled “Edge of the Field in Autumn” (i.e. the last two photos). Anyone have strong preferences between these alternatives?

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Seed Head
Seed Head
'Our' Beaver Swamp & Robb Mountain
'Our' Beaver Swamp & Robb Mountain
Powder Mill Pond
Powder Mill Pond
Autumn Road
Autumn Road
Autumn Vista
Autumn Vista
Barn in Autumn #1
Barn in Autumn #1
Barn in Autumn #2
Barn in Autumn #2
Field in Autumn
Field in Autumn
Edge of the Field in Autumn #1
Edge of the Field in Autumn #1
Edge of the Field in Autumn #2
Edge of the Field in Autumn #2

 

More Abstracts

Filed under: Autumn — Tags: — Frank @ 7:00 PM

Over the past couple of weeks, I have added photographs to both of my recent abstract projects (“Flow” and “Autumnal Abstracts“), here are the latest:

 

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North Branch Flow #1
North Branch Flow #1
North Branch Flow #2
North Branch Flow #2
North Branch Flow #3
North Branch Flow #3
North Branch Flow #4
North Branch Flow #4
North Branch Flow #5
North Branch Flow #5
North Branch Flow #6
North Branch Flow #6
North Branch Flow #7
North Branch Flow #7
Autumnal Abstract #8
Autumnal Abstract #8
Autumnal Abstract #9
Autumnal Abstract #9
Autumnal Abstract #10
Autumnal Abstract #10
Autumnal Abstract #11
Autumnal Abstract #11
Autumnal Abstract #12
Autumnal Abstract #12

 

15 October 2014

Gregg Lake in Autumn

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Frank @ 12:01 PM

Yesterday afternoon, with temperatures around 70 degrees F and rapidly moving clouds aloft, Joan and I headed down to camp to get the sailboat out of the water.

After we finished the job, I headed out around the lake in the kayak to photograph. I headed back for home only when the sun left the lake.

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Patten Hill in Autumn (view from Gregg Lake)
Patten Hill in Autumn (view from Gregg Lake)
Patten Hill in Autumn (view from Gregg Lake) #2
Patten Hill in Autumn (view from Gregg Lake) #2
Gregg Lake Shore in Autumn #1
Gregg Lake Shore in Autumn #1
Gregg Lake Shore in Autumn #2
Gregg Lake Shore in Autumn #2

 

Gregg Lake Panoramas

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 12:00 PM

The autumn foliage has been about peak for the past few days.

My photographic tendency, when it comes to landscapes, is to concentrate on the details; the “intimate landscape” a lá Eliot Porter.

However, every once in a while, I figure out how to capture the larger landscape. One mechanism for doing this is the panorama; digital photography has made it easy to build panoramas without special equipment.

The first of these panoramas was constructed by combining three frames shot from Gregg Lake Road on a cold, gray day (last Saturday). The second combines two frames shot from my kayak on a warm, mostly sunny day (yesterday).

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Gregg Lake from the Road (three frames)
Gregg Lake from the Road (three frames)
Patten Hill and 'Our' Cove (two frames)
Patten Hill and 'Our' Cove (two frames)

 

4 October 2014

Ashuelot Flow

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 8:00 PM

As I headed north on Route 10 (after my attempt to photograph the Gilsum stone arch bridge) I noticed an obvious parking area with access to the river along the road. I pulled in and a within a couple of dozen steps found myself along a riffled stretch of river with very un-photogenic banks; the light was lousy as well.

Adding a neutral density filter to my lens, which allowed shutter of a few seconds, I spent roughly a half hour exploring the riffles with my camera on the tripod.

Life… Lemons… Lemonade?

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Ashuelot Flow #1
Ashuelot Flow #1
Ashuelot Flow #2
Ashuelot Flow #2
Ashuelot Flow #3
Ashuelot Flow #3
Ashuelot Flow #4
Ashuelot Flow #4
Ashuelot Flow #5
Ashuelot Flow #5
Ashuelot Flow #6
Ashuelot Flow #6

 

Ashuelot River at Gilsum

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 6:00 PM

After a day of rain on Wednesday, Thursday dawned with a heavy overcast. However, by mid-afternoon the skies seemed to lighten a bit and I headed out to see if I could photograph the stone arch bridge in Gilsum, NH. One of the tallest bridges of its type, it spans a mini-canyon carved by the Ashuelot River.

The terrain (high steep river banks and the curve of the river) and a gauging station conspire against nice photos of the bridge from river level, but I was able to make some nice photos of the river just upstream from the bridge.

As I was headed north on route 10, back towards home, I noticed some “interesting” light developing and was able to find a spot to pull off the road and take advantage of the short interval (two minutes, maybe) before the light turned dull and drab again. The last photo is the result of this quick stop.

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Craig Road Bridge
Craig Road Bridge
Ashuelot River #1
Ashuelot River #1
Ashuelot River #2
Ashuelot River #2
Ashuelot River #3
Ashuelot River #3
Ashuelot River #4
Ashuelot River #4
Ashuelot River #5
Ashuelot River #5

 

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