Photographs by Frank

6 October 2017

Good Oak

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank @ 10:00 PM

There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery,
and the other that heat comes from the furnace.

To avoid the first danger, one should plant a garden, preferably where there is no grocer to confuse the issue.

To avoid the second, he should lay a split of good oak on the andirons, preferably where there is no furnace,
and let it warm his shins while a February blizzard tosses the trees outside. If one has cut, split, hauled,
and piled his own good oak, and let his mind work the while, he will remember much about where the heat comes from,
and with a wealth of detail denied to those who spend the week-end in town astride a radiator.

 

The words above are the first three paragraphs of the entry in Aldo Leopold’s Sand County Journal  titled “Good Oak”.  Among the many memorable passages in this classic work, this one is always foremost in my mind.

Recently, Joan and I had occasion to visit the Leopold Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin.

These folks are the caretakers of the Leopold family’s “shack” and of the Parthenon. While we were visiting, I was delighted to find that the site of the “good oak” whose demise under the saw Leopold goes on to describe in his essay had been marked for posterity.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
The Leopold Shack
The Leopold Shack
The Parthenon
The Parthenon
The Good Oak
The Good Oak

 

2017 Road Trip — Cranes

Filed under: Birds — Tags: — Frank @ 9:45 PM

On our way home we spent time at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin; rather than repeat what is already written, you can read about the history of the ICF by  clicking here.

In addition to their ‘signature’ whooping cranes, the ICF displays all of the fifteen species of cranes found world-wide. I did not photograph all fifteen, but did get a nice selection of photos of these captive animals without too much man-made stuff interfering.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Whattled Crane (captive animal)
Whattled Crane   (captive animal)
Brogla (captive animal)
Brogla  (captive animal)
dsc5068
dsc5068
Crane Feathers (detail)
Crane Feathers (detail)
Black-necked Crane (captive animal)
Black-necked Crane   (captive animal)
dsc5300
dsc5300
dsc5286
dsc5286
Black Crowned Crane #1 (captive animal)
Black Crowned Crane #1  (captive animal)
Black Crowned Crane #2 (captive animal)
Black Crowned Crane #2  (captive animal)
dsc5071
dsc5071
Whooping Crane #1 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #1 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #2 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #2 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #3 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #3 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #4 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #4 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #5 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #5 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #6 (captive animal)
Whooping Crane #6 (captive animal)

2017 Road Trip — River Bottom Homestead

Filed under: Landscapes — Tags: , — Frank @ 9:30 PM

Within the CW Russell NWR, a short but muddy walk from the road, lies the remains of an old Missouri River homestead.

Two generations of log cabin are present… an older wood chinked structure and a newer cement chinked structure. The older structure once had a sod roof. The newer structure was used recently enough that it once had electricity.

There are also the remains of a number of outbuildings (barns and sheds) as well as remnants of fences and corrals.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Old Log Cabin
Old Log Cabin
Old Log Cabin Interior
Old Log Cabin Interior
Gate and Fences
Gate and Fences
Old Cabin (detail)
Old Cabin (detail)
Out Building #1
Out Building #1
Out Building #2
Out Building #2
Old Cabin and Gate
Old Cabin and Gate
Old Cabin and Fence
Old Cabin and Fence
New Cabin #1
New Cabin #1
New Cabin (interior) #1
New Cabin (interior) #1
New Cabin (interior) #2
New Cabin (interior) #2
Out Building #3
Out Building #3
Out Building (detail)
Out Building (detail)
New Cabin #2
New Cabin #2
New Cabin (detail) #1
New Cabin (detail) #1
New Cabin #3
New Cabin #3
New Cabin #4
New Cabin #4

 

2017 Road Trip — Landscapes

Filed under: Early Fall,Landscapes — Tags: — Frank @ 9:00 PM

When in Yellowstone one must make photographs of the geothermal features. Here are mine!

The microbial mats around the geothermal features are a source of constant fascination to this retired biochemist.

TAC polymerase which makes the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) possible was isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a bacterium that lives in hot springs.  Possibly, this fact is the source of my interest in these mats.

 

Yellowstone NP

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Geyser #1
Geyser #1
Geyser #2
Geyser #2
Microbial Mat #1
Microbial Mat #1
Geothermal Pool #1
Geothermal Pool #1
Geothermal Pool #2
Geothermal Pool #2
Geothermal Pools
Geothermal Pools
Geothermal Pools/Microbial Mat
Geothermal Pools/Microbial Mat
Firestone River #1
Firestone River #1
Firestone River #2
Firestone River #2
Geothermal Pool Outflow
Geothermal Pool Outflow
Geothermal Vent
Geothermal Vent
Geyser Cone
Geyser Cone
Geyser #3
Geyser #3
Microbial Mat #2
Microbial Mat #2
Microbial Mat #3
Microbial Mat #3
Untitled
Untitled
Lewis River
Lewis River
Untitled #2
Untitled #2
Microbial Mat #4
Microbial Mat #4
Geothermal Pool #3
Geothermal Pool #3
Geothermal Pool #4
Geothermal Pool #4
Untitled #3
Untitled #3
Mammoth Hot Springs #1
Mammoth Hot Springs #1
Mammoth Hot Springs #2
Mammoth Hot Springs #2
Mammoth Hot Springs #3
Mammoth Hot Springs #3

 

We also spent a very cloudy drab afternoon in Grand Teton NP. The afternoon included a stop at the overlook where Ansel Adams’ well know photograph titled “The Tetons – Snake River” was made; the view has changed much since 1941-1942.

 

Grand Teton NP

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Snake River #1
Snake River #1
Snake River #1
Snake River #1
Tetons #1
Tetons #1
Tetons #2
Tetons #2
Tetons #3
Tetons #3

 

Other Black & White Landscapes

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Red Rock Lakes NWR #1
Red Rock Lakes NWR #1
Red Rock Lakes NWR #2
Red Rock Lakes NWR #2
Red Rock Lakes NWR #3
Red Rock Lakes NWR #3
Aspens #1
Aspens #1
Aspens #2
Aspens #2
Hot SPrings (Yellowstone NP)
Hot SPrings (Yellowstone NP)
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Untitled #2
Untitled #2
Untitled #3
Untitled #3
Untitled #4
Untitled #4
Monmouth Hot Springs #1
Monmouth Hot Springs #1
Monmouth Hot Springs #2
Monmouth Hot Springs #2
Monmouth Hot Springs #3
Monmouth Hot Springs #3
Monmouth Hot Springs #4
Monmouth Hot Springs #4
Heat Decayed Rock
Heat Decayed Rock
Untitled #5
Untitled #5
Progress?
Progress?
The Lonely Road
The Lonely Road
Lone Tree
Lone Tree

 


 

1 October 2017

2017 Road Trip — Wildlife

Filed under: Autumn,Birds,Mammals,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 10:30 PM

On Labor Day (4 Sept) we headed out on the road. Our immediate destination was western Montana and a nephews wedding on the 9th.

After the wedding festivities were over, we began the meat of the trip. Our first destination was Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), just to the west of Yellowstone National Park, our second destination. We spent five nights in Yellowstone and then wildlife refuge hopped back east.

We visited C.M Russell NWR, Bowdoin NWR, and Medicine Lake NWR all in Montana, Lostwood NWR, Des Lacs NWR and Upper Souris NWR in North Dakota and Agassiz NWR in Minnesota. We also visited the International Crane Foundation and the Aldo Leopold Foundation in  Baraboo, Wisconsin before heading home.

We arrived home yesterday (Saturday, 30 Sept) having driven just over 7,400 miles in total.

Of course, I made one or two photographs along the way! Here is the first installment… wildlife photographs.

More to follow over the next few days.

Birds

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
White-crowned Sparrow, Male (Red Rock Lakes NWR)
White-crowned Sparrow, Male (Red Rock Lakes NWR)
dsc3046
dsc3046
White-crowned Sparrows, Pair (Red Rock Lakes NWR)
White-crowned Sparrows, Pair (Red Rock Lakes NWR)
Mountain Bluebird ((Yellowstone NP))
Mountain Bluebird ((Yellowstone NP))
Mountain Bluebird #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Mountain Bluebird #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Greater Yellow Legs (Bowdoin NWR)
Greater Yellow Legs (Bowdoin NWR)
Plover (Bowdoin NWR)
Plover (Bowdoin NWR)
Killdeer (Bowdoin NWR)
Killdeer (Bowdoin NWR)
American Avocet #1 (Bowdoin NWR)
American Avocet #1 (Bowdoin NWR)
American Avocet #2 (Bowdoin NWR)
American Avocet #2 (Bowdoin NWR)
While Pelicans
While Pelicans
Perigrine Falcon
Perigrine Falcon
White Pelican Taking Flight
White Pelican Taking Flight

Mammals

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Pronghorn Antelope (Red Rock Lake NWR)
Pronghorn Antelope (Red Rock Lake NWR)
Bison Herd (Yellowstone NP)
Bison Herd (Yellowstone NP)
Bison Rut ((Yellowstone NP))
Bison Rut ((Yellowstone NP))
Grazing Bison #1 (Yellowstone NP)
Grazing Bison #1 (Yellowstone NP)
Grazing Bison #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Grazing Bison #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Grazing Bison #3 (Yellowstone NP)
Grazing Bison #3 (Yellowstone NP)
Bison (Yellowstone NP)
Bison (Yellowstone NP)
Rutting Bison #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Rutting Bison #2 (Yellowstone NP)
Rutting Bison #3 (Yellowstone NP)
Rutting Bison #3 (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Doe (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Doe (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Doe #2(Yellowstone NP)
Elk Doe #2(Yellowstone NP)
Bugeling Elk Bull (Yellowstone NP)
Bugeling Elk Bull (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Bull (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Bull (Yellowstone NP)
Elk Bull #1 (CM Russell NWR)
Elk Bull #1 (CM Russell NWR)
Elk Bull #2 (CM Russell NWR)
Elk Bull #2 (CM Russell NWR)
Party Animal Elk (CM Russell NWR)
Party Animal Elk (CM Russell NWR)
Bugeling Elk Bull with Harem (CM Russell NWR)
Bugeling Elk Bull with Harem (CM Russell NWR)

 

2 September 2017

Stonewall Farm

Filed under: Early Fall,Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Summer — Tags: , — Frank @ 1:30 PM

Yesterday afternoon I spent some time at the Stonewall Farm an agricultural education center (among other things) in Keene, NH. I took a walk on their extensive trail network, but I found many things to photograph right near their buildings.

After leaving the farm, I meandered toward Brattleborough and discovered a new (to me) meetinghouse, the Park Hill Meetinghouse in Westmoreland, NH. I’ll certainly be heading back here in the light of November and hunting for the ‘perfect’ sky.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Barn Board with Tassels
Barn Board with Tassels
String Beans
String Beans
Pumpkins
Pumpkins
Peppers
Peppers
Nelly
Nelly
Untitled
Untitled
Park Hill Meetinghouse (Westmoreland, NH)
Park Hill Meetinghouse (Westmoreland, NH)

 

28 August 2017

Another August Afternoon Amble

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 10:30 PM

This afternoon I made a left at the bottom of our driveway and headed down towards the bridge. My goal, however, was not the bridge. Rather, I was headed for the old log yard and the beaver pond on the road to Balancing Rock (on the land recently acquired by the Harris Center).

The old log yard which was bare just a few years ago is now full of wildflowers and berries. I was expecting to find meadowhawks here and was not disappointed. I observed more than a dozen; more males than females. There were also a few darners flying about and hunting overhead.

At the beaver pond, I found a single spreadwing and a single female bluet along the outlet stream. I sat at the edge of the pond near a log with an exuvia clinging to its underside and watched three male slaty skimmers having spectacular dog fights over the bit of pond shore I was watching. Every once in a while one would perch nearby for a very short interval before heading back into the battle for territory.

As I arose to leave I noticed some ode like movement out of the corner of my eye. My departure was delayed as I watched a lone female common pondhawk unsuccessfully hunting. After about five minutes she flew out of sight and I headed home.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (female)
Meadowhawk (female)
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Spreadwing
Spreadwing
Exuvia
Exuvia
Slaty Skimmer (male)
Slaty Skimmer (male)
Common Pondhawk (female)
Common Pondhawk (female)

 

Hattie Brown Road

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:00 AM

Yesterday afternoon, Joan and I walked up Hattie Brown Road to the beaver-made wetland. The weather was partly sunny and the temperature was in the low 70s F; there was a light intermittent breeze. Perfect weather for late August and for odes.

As I expected there were meadowhawks present along the road. We saw roughly a dozen individuals, both males and females in approximately equal numbers, perched from the ground to eye-level on the vegetation. We also saw a single meadowhawk mating wheel.

Additionally there were similar numbers (at least a dozen) of Canada darners present. Most were patrolling / hunting out over the water. However, we observed two ovipositing females and a couple of individuals (one with prey) perched in the roadside shrubbery.

Lastly, we observed three or four spreadwings perched low to the ground in the roadside vegetation.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Meadowhawk (female or immature male)
Meadowhawk (female or immature male)
Canada Darner (male) with Prey
Canada Darner (male) with Prey
Canada Darner (male) with Prey
Canada Darner (male) with Prey
Canada Darner (male)
Canada Darner (male)
Meadowhawk (imm. male)
Meadowhawk (imm. male)
Canada Darner Ovipositing
Canada Darner Ovipositing
Swamp (?) Spreadwing (male)
Swamp (?) Spreadwing (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Canada Darner (female?)
Canada Darner (female?)

 

25 August 2017

American Rubyspots – 2017 Edition

Filed under: Odontates,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 10:03 AM

Two years ago (minus a few days) I drove roughly an hour and fifteen minutes to photograph American Rubyspots in Athol, Mass. Ever since then, I have been wanting to find Rubyspots in New Hampshire.

Last spring, I met Chris from Hollis, NH at a NH Coverts program. He told me of a spot in his home town where this species could be found and a few days ago he emailed to inform me that he had seen and photographed rubyspots there this past week.

Thus, yesterday afternoon I made the trip to the Beaver Brook Association‘s reservation in Hollis. It was only an hours drive and the site (where Brookline Road crosses the Nissitissit River) lies roughly a hundred yards north of the Mass. line.

As Chris promised, American Rubyspots were easy to find. I saw roughly a dozen individuals, mostly male but there were also one or two females present. I also saw a couple of male variable dancers and numerous meadowhawks (mostly male and probably Autumn Meadowhawks) along the edge of the parking area. Additionally, there was a single spreadwing mixed in with the rubyspots low along the river’s edge.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
American Rubyspot (male)
American Rubyspot  (male)
American Rubyspot (male)
American Rubyspot  (male)
American Rubyspot (male)
American Rubyspot  (male)
American Rubyspot (male)
American Rubyspot  (male)
American Rubyspot (female)
American Rubyspot (female)
Spreadwing
Spreadwing

 

24 August 2017

Good Odeing

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:00 AM

Yesterday afternoon was sunny, warm (temperatures in the mid 70s F) and windy. Good weather for odeing… except for the wind.

I headed out and decided to stay away from the water where the wind would be strongest. I split my time between Elmwood Junction in Hancock (near where Moose Brook flows into Powdermill Pond) and the field at the boat launch on the Contoocook River in Greenfield (near the covered bridge).

The numbers of individuals was fairly small but the variety of species I observed was amazing. I photographed nine species between the two sites.

At Elmwood Junction, I photographed a single male slender spreadwing, a small number of male variable dancers and meadowhawks (probably autumn meadowhawks) of both sexes. The damselflies were located down near the water, in a spot protected from the wind. The meadowhawks were in sunny spots along the road. (The first five photos below are from Elmwood Junction.)

At the field by the boat launch, I observed (and photographed) a couple of male Eastern Forktails, one (and maybe two) male Eastern Amberwings, a small number (maybe half a dozen) male Calico Pennants, a single female Widow Skimmer (which allowed me exactly one exposure before it flew off to part unknown), a number of meadowhawks (mostly male but a few females) and a single male Slaty Skimmer.

I also photographed (see the last photo) a female Common Pondhawk. I saw this elusive “gal” on three separate occasions over about a fifteen minute period, but was able to make only two exposures on the last time I saw it.

I saw no odes down by the river at the boat launch, but it was quite windy so this is not unexpected.

At both sites, meadowhawks (most probably Autumn Meadowhawks) were, by far, the most common species I observed and males outnumbered females by about three to one.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Slender Spreadwing (male) ?
Slender Spreadwing (male) ?
Variable Dancer (male) with Prey
Variable Dancer (male) with Prey
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
Meadowhawk (male)
White-faced Meadowhawk (female) ?
White-faced Meadowhawk (female) ?
Eastern Forktail (male)
Eastern Forktail (male)
Eastern Amberwing (male)
Eastern Amberwing (male)
Eastern Amberwing (male)
Eastern Amberwing (male)
Calico Pennant (male)
Calico Pennant (male)
Widow Skimmer (female)
Widow Skimmer (female)
Meadowhawk (female)
Meadowhawk (female)
Slaty Skimmer(male)
Slaty Skimmer(male)
Slaty Skimmer(male)
Slaty Skimmer(male)
ID Needed
ID Needed

 

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress