Photographs by Frank

21 November 2018

Serious Snow — Early

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Frank @ 10:00 PM

Back when I first moved to New Hampshire, forty odd years ago (1976 to be exact), we often got our first serious snow before Thanksgiving. The ground was then snow covered until spring. These days, with the warming climate, serious snow in November is a rare event.

This year is shaping up to be one of those rare years. We have had about ten or twelve inches of snow in the past few days. The ground is well covered and it is likely to stay that way until spring. We will see.

This morning, we awoke to the usual gray November skies. At least there was no snow falling.  Mid-morning, I took the camera with me as I headed to town to pick up our Thanksgiving bird. As I headed out, there were faint traces of blue sky starting to appear. By the time I headed home (maybe forty five minutes later), the clouds had broken and the sun was shining nicely. I was able to use my camera to good advantage. Alas, the break in the November gray was transitory. More clouds rolled back in within the hour.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Our deck, yesterday
Our deck, yesterday
Gregg Lake
Gregg Lake
Snowy Tree
Snowy Tree
Hattie Brown Brook, Winter
Hattie Brown Brook, Winter
Winter Woods #1
Winter Woods #1
Winter Woods #2
Winter Woods #2
Winter Woods #3
Winter Woods #3
Winter Woods #4
Winter Woods #4

 

20 November 2018

Unanticipated Consequences

Filed under: architecture,Landscapes — Frank @ 12:01 PM

I made this exposure back on the 12th of November at the church in East Washington, NH. The building was locked up tight. Thus I was outside with the camera help above my head and the lens pressed flat against the window pane. I framed the photo using the tilting LCD on the back of the camera. Ain’t modern technology wonderful!?

One might ask how I knew that this scene existed if I had to hold the camera above my head. Well, I initially peeked in the window by standing on tiptoes on a small ledge and steadying myself by holding on to the sill. The scene, lit by the late afternoon window light, was wonderful but I was not going to be able to photograph it while standing on that ledge.

When I got back to my digital darkroom (i.e. the computer) I cropped the frame (as I most often do) to a 4:5 ratio, converted it to black and white and “developed” the image to my liking (in this case with a very slight warm tone). Next, I went to make a print.

One of the features of Lightroom’s print module is that it remembers which print template you had used during your last session. In this case, it just so happened, that the template which popped up containing my 4:5 cropped image was set to make a square print.

I was immediately struck by the square-cropped version, a possibility that I had not considered. The image had much more impact cropped to 1:1 than at the 4:5 ratio I had originally selected. Being stubborn, I printed both versions and have spent some time living with them.

The square crop is, to my mind, definitely stronger. What say you?

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Pews, East Washington NH (1:1)
Pews, East Washington NH (1:1)
Pews, East Washington NH (4:5)
Pews, East Washington NH (4:5)

Here are two more photos made using my camera obscura on the same afternoon. Since the ground glass of the camera obscura is square, these images are always in the 1:1 ratio. The two photos were made from essentially the same spot, at roughly ninety degrees from each other.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Baptist Church, East Washington NH
Baptist Church, East Washington NH
Grange Hall, East Washington, NH
Grange Hall, East Washington, NH

 


 

11 November 2018

Photographic Folios

Filed under: Landscapes — Tags: — Frank @ 12:00 AM

One of the definitions of the word “folio” is “an individual leaf of paper or parchment”.

Brooks Jensen, the editor/publisher of Lenswork, has written about the idea of photographic folios*, an unbound collection of small prints wrapped up in an elegant folder.

In the past, I have made folios consisting of 5″x 7″ prints printed on half of a letter-sized sheet of paper and wrapped up in a home-made cover folded from a single sheet of heavy, decorative paper. These were quite economical to produce and I was quite satisfied with the final product. However, I did feel that margins allowed in this format were somewhat skimpy and thus the images felt a bit cramped. (I don’t believe that I wrote about these earlier efforts so I can’t point to a previous blog entry with more detailed information… sorry.)

In pondering what to do with some of my photographs from our recent trip to the southwest, I decided to revisit the idea of folios.

This time, I decided to use a full letter-sized sheet of paper for each print and to incorporate generous margins (three-quarters of an inch on top and one and three-quarters inches on the other three sides); the printed images are 7.5″x 6″. The end result has a much more luxurious feel than my earlier, smaller efforts.

When making an artifact that is meant to be handled, the materials used are much more important than, for instance, a photograph destined to be encased in a mat and frame and hung upon the wall. In the former case, the artifact has to feel nice when you pick it up! Thus, the paper used for printing is a critical part of the experience.

For this project, I decided to use nice heavy papers and to avoid papers that have a plastic-y feel. Of course, as with almost all of my prints, I only considered papers with a luster finish… not too shiny, but not completely matte either.

I ended up using a different paper for each of the two folios I have completed. For the first folio (titled “Canyon Light”) I used Canson Baryta Photographique (310 g/sq. meter and alpha-cellulose based). For the second folio (“Puebloan Ruins”) I used Epson Legacy Platine (314 g/ sq. meter and cotton rag based). Both papers worked well, but the Epson paper, because of its cotton rag base, does have a nicer, very soft feel when you hold a print.

In addition to the prints, the other, equally important component of a folio is the cover… first impressions are important! Although, I am usually a do-it-yourself kind of guy when it comes to things like this, for this project I decided to save some time and effort by purchasing folio covers from Dane Creek Folios. They are high quality and reasonably priced. Highly recommended.

Well enough about the presentation… what about the photographs!?

Thus far,, I have completed two folios each consisting of ten black and white images. The first folio (titled Canyon Light) contains photographs of the Grand Canyon from river-level. These were made during the ten days we spent rafting the river. The second folio (Puebloan Ruins) contains photographs of the ancient Native American ruins at a number of sites in the four-corners area.

Clicking on the title of each folio (above) with get you an electronic facsimile (as a pdf file) of the folio. These are, in my opinion, a poor substitute for the physical  object. You will have to come for a visit to see the real thing!


* He has even produced a DVD workshop about his approach to folios. However, I must confess that I have not seen this video.

10 November 2018

Random Photos

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 10:07 PM

I often carry a camera with me as I go about my day-to-day activities. Sometimes I even activate the shutter release!

These photos were all made in the month or so since we returned from our road trip. During yesterday’s rain, I remembered to take the memory card out of the camera and see what had accumulated.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Roadside Oddity #9
Roadside Oddity #9
Autumn Cascade
Autumn Cascade
Autumn Leaves
Autumn Leaves
October Skies
October Skies
Untitled
Untitled
Pumpkin
Pumpkin
Fungi
Fungi
Morning Light
Morning Light

 

11 October 2018

2018 Road Trip (Part 9) — Great Sand Dunes National Park

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:15 PM

Great Sand Dunes National Park in south central Colorado was the last “scenic” stop on our road trip.

We arrived in the late afternoon to interesting light on the dunes and made some good photos. The details in the windblown sand were as interesting to me as the epic landscape. The sun went behind some clouds on the horizon well before it set ending photography for the day. Such is life.

We camped for the night and hoped for nice light in the morning. Alas, this was not to be. However, we got an early start towards home!

These dunes are, simply said, fantastic… unreal. They scale is difficult to comprehend… there are some very tiny people in some of the frames. The first ridge of dunes (which is all one can see here) is 700 feet high.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Great Sand Dunes 01
 Great Sand Dunes 01
Great Sand Dunes 02
 Great Sand Dunes 02
Great Sand Dunes 03
 Great Sand Dunes 03
Great Sand Dunes 04
 Great Sand Dunes 04
Great Sand Dunes 05
 Great Sand Dunes 05
Great Sand Dunes 06
 Great Sand Dunes 06
Great Sand Dunes 07
 Great Sand Dunes 07
Great Sand Dunes 08
 Great Sand Dunes 08
Great Sand Dunes 09
 Great Sand Dunes 09
Great Sand Dunes 10
 Great Sand Dunes 10
Great Sand Dunes 11
 Great Sand Dunes 11
Great Sand Dunes 12
 Great Sand Dunes 12

< Part 8

2018 Road Trip (Part 8) — Mesa Verde National Park

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:15 PM

Not much to say… Mesa Verde, in southwestern Colorado, is reputed to be “the site” for prehistoric Native American ruins. It lives up to its reputation. We spent a rainy morning in the museum. It was as interesting as any of the outdoor sites.

Color work —

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Mesa Verde 01
Mesa Verde 01
Mesa Verde 02
Mesa Verde 02
Mesa Verde 03
Mesa Verde 03
Mesa Verde 04
Mesa Verde 04
Mesa Verde 05
Mesa Verde 05
Mesa Verde 06
Mesa Verde 06
Mesa Verde 07
Mesa Verde 07
Mesa Verde 08
Mesa Verde 08
Mesa Verde 09
Mesa Verde 09

Black and white work —

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Mesa Verde 10
Mesa Verde 10
Mesa Verde 11
Mesa Verde 11
Mesa Verde 12
Mesa Verde 12
Mesa Verde 13
Mesa Verde 13
Mesa Verde 14
Mesa Verde 14
Mesa Verde 15
Mesa Verde 15
Mesa Verde 16
Mesa Verde 16
Mesa Verde 17
Mesa Verde 17

< Part 7Part 9>

2018 Road Trip (Part 7) — Natural Bridges & Hovenweep National Monuments

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:15 PM

On the drive from Capitol Reef NP to Hovenweep National Monument we made a brief stop at Natural Bridges National Monument to view the sights from the rim. Between the altitudes and the knees, the steep hike to the bottom of the canyon for close up views of the bridges was not on the agenda.

Natural Bridges

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Natural Bridges 01
Natural Bridges 01
Natural Bridges 02
Natural Bridges 02
Natural Bridges 03
Natural Bridges 03
Natural Bridges 04
Natural Bridges 04
Natural Bridges 05
Natural Bridges 05

The drive from Capitol Reef in south central Utah to Hovenweep National Monument on the Utah- Colorado border passes through some of the most desolate and fantastic terrain I have even experienced, we did not stop to make any photographs… we were pressed for time and for places to safely pull the camper off the roadside. A return trip is certainly warranted.

The remote Hovenweep National Monument is well worth the trip to this out of the way spot. It is not as “built up” as the busier Mesa Verde National Park, The ruins are not as large or as extensive as in Mesa Verde but they are very accessible and interesting.

Hovenweep

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Hovenweep 01
Hovenweep 01
Hovenweep 02
Hovenweep 02
Hovenweep 03
Hovenweep 03
Hovenweep 04
Hovenweep 04
Hovenweep 05
Hovenweep 05
Hovenweep 06
Hovenweep 06
Hovenweep 07
Hovenweep 07
Hovenweep 08
Hovenweep 08
Hovenweep 09
Hovenweep 09
Hovenweep 10
Hovenweep 10
Hovenweep 11
Hovenweep 11
Hovenweep 12
Hovenweep 12

< Part 6Part 8>

2018 Road Trip (Part 6) — Capitol Reef National Park

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:14 PM

After the (photographically) tough conditions at Bryce, Capitol Reef National Park was a cake walk. The light (especially in the evening) was perfectly directed and the skies had wonderful clouds. In addition to driving the roads, we hiked in both of the accessible side canyons, Grand Wash and Capitol Gorge.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Capitol Reef 01
Capitol Reef 01
Capitol Reef 02
Capitol Reef 02
Capitol Reef 03
Capitol Reef 03
Capitol Reef 04
Capitol Reef 04
Capitol Reef 05
Capitol Reef 05
Capitol Reef 06
Capitol Reef 06
Capitol Reef 07
Capitol Reef 07
Capitol Reef 08
Capitol Reef 08
Capitol Reef 09
Capitol Reef 09
Capitol Reef 10
Capitol Reef 10
Capitol Reef 11
Capitol Reef 11
Capitol Reef 12
Capitol Reef 12
Capitol Reef 13
Capitol Reef 13
Capitol Reef 14
Capitol Reef 14
Capitol Reef 15
Capitol Reef 15
Capitol Reef 16
Capitol Reef 16
Capitol Reef 17
Capitol Reef 17
Capitol Reef 18
Capitol Reef 18

< Part 5Part 7>

2018 Road Trip (Part 5) — Bryce Canyon National Park

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:14 PM

Our next stop and our first in southern Utah was Bryce National Park. This park was tough for me photographically*. It was still an interesting place to see in person after seeing many, many photographs.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Bryce Canyon 01
Bryce Canyon 01
Bryce Canyon 02
Bryce Canyon 02
Bryce Canyon 03
Bryce Canyon 03
Bryce Canyon 04
Bryce Canyon 04
Bryce Canyon 05
Bryce Canyon 05
Bryce Canyon 06
Bryce Canyon 06
Bryce Canyon 07
Bryce Canyon 07
Bryce Canyon 08
Bryce Canyon 08
Bryce Canyon 09
Bryce Canyon 09
Bryce Canyon 10
Bryce Canyon 10
Bryce Canyon 11
Bryce Canyon 11
Bryce Canyon 12
Bryce Canyon 12
Bryce Canyon 13
Bryce Canyon 13
Bryce Canyon 14
Bryce Canyon 14
Bryce Canyon 15
Bryce Canyon 15
Bryce Canyon 16
Bryce Canyon 16
Bryce Canyon 17
Bryce Canyon 17
Bryce Canyon 18
Bryce Canyon 18

* The light was harsh most of the time we were there and the light in much of the canyon (which was accessible without a long steep hike) faded early, well before sunset.


< Part 4Part 6>

2018 Road Trip (Part 4) — Sunset Crater & Wupatki National Monuments

Filed under: Landscapes,Road Trips — Frank @ 9:14 PM

Heading north from Flagstaff after our raft trip, we did not go far (maybe twenty-five miles) before stopping at the two adjacent national monuments. Sunset Crater preserves some interested and geologically recent, volcanic features. The weather the morning we were there was drab and rainy… not very good for photography of dark lava, but it was interesting none-the-less. The weather improved as the day progressed and we moved on to Wupatki which preserves a number of early Native American ruins.

NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail
Sunset Crater 01
Sunset Crater 01
Sunset Crater 02
Sunset Crater 02
Sunset Crater 03
Sunset Crater  03
Sunset Crater 04
Sunset Crater 04
Wupatki 01
Wupatki 01
Wupatki 02
Wupatki 02
Wupatki 03
Wupatki 03
Wupatki 04
Wupatki 04

< Part 3Part 5 >

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress