Photographs by Frank

12 June 2022

Flag Leaves

Filed under: Misc.,Still Life — Frank @ 9:30 PM

A couple of days ago I cut two stalks of ‘grass’ while I was out and about. I thought that they might make a good photograph.

This afternoon, I set up the stalks on our deck railing and made some photographs. I envisioned making black and white photos of the stalks and eventually salted-paper prints.

As I was framing up my first exposures, I had an epiphany… the leaves attached to these stalks are “flag leaves”!

I recently learned about flag leaves from the current issue of The Limrik, Antrim’s quarterly community newsletter/journal. It just so happens that Joan is the managing editor of this esteemed publication. I am, by virtue of being married to Joan, the photo editor and business manager.

One of the articles in the June 2022 issue is about the “Flag Leaf Bakery”, a new bakery that will be opening soon in downtown Antrim. During Joan’s interview with the owners of the bakery they described the origin of its name. I quote…”The name “Flag Leaf” comes from the last leaf to develop on the wheat stalk before the seed head forms. The emerging flag leaf signals the end of the plant’s vegetative growth phase and its photosynthesis provides a large fraction of the energy needed for seed production.”

I am not sure if the stalks I collected are wheat, but the leaves attached to these stalks are clearly flag leaves.

Life is full of interesting convergences!

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Flag Leaf #1
Flag Leaf #1
Flag Leaves
Flag Leaves

Around the Yard on a Sunday Afternoon

This afternoon I took a short stroll around the yard just to see what was up.

There were a few odes about and a number of swallowtails nectaring on Joan’s garden flowers. Speaking of garden flowers, the poppies have really ‘popped’ in the last several days.

The frog is a resident of the small pool I built this spring*, hoping to attract wildlife (especially birds) to photograph without attracting the local bears (as would putting out seed for the birds). I have yet to find the time to ‘stake out’ the pool and see what, if any, birds come by but this frog moved in within a few days of my filling the pool with water.

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American Emerald (male)
American Emerald (male)
Swallowtail Nectaring
Swallowtail Nectaring
Whiteface (sp? (female)
Whiteface (sp? (female)
Our Resident Frog
Our Resident Frog
Chalk-fronted Corporal (female)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (female)
Aurora Damsels (tandem pair)
Aurora Damsels (tandem pair)
Poppy Bud
Poppy Bud
Poppy
Poppy

* The wooden handles on our wheelbarrow rotted out and were unrepairable. Of course the plastic tub was still in good shape so I disassembled the wheelbarrow and plugged the holes in the tub where the bolts pierced it. I then buried the tub in the ground and added some strategic rocks to cover the exposed plastic of the tub. Joan added some plants to further naturalize the setting and now we have a small ‘water feature’ out near the greenhouse.

8 June 2022

Loon Sitting

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 8:01 PM

Late yesterday afternoon, I headed down to the lake to observe the loon nest. There was not a lot of action.

I watched for an hour and three-quarters. In that time the individual on the nest shifted position quickly twice. I am not sure they even turned the eggs.

At about ninety minutes, I got up to stretched my legs and saw a second loon off the end of the point on the main part of the lake. This gave me hope that they might do a switch so I sat back down and waited another fifteen minutes before I decided that dinner was in order.

All told, I made about sixty exposures, mostly to keep myself entertained, not because there was great action!*

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Loon on Nest (with 2x teleconverter)
Loon on Nest (with 2x teleconverter)
Loon Shifting Position on Nest (Maybe Turning Eggs)
Loon Shifting Position on Nest (Maybe Turning Eggs)
Loon on Nest
Loon on Nest

I also experimented with video, something I rarely do. Here is a three minute clip that really gives you a feel for the ‘excitement’ of loon watching!

Try to stay awake… I did for more than an hour and a half!!!!

* WARNING – photographer talk ahead! The first few exposures yesterday afternoon were made using with a 2x teleconverter (a different one from the one I used several days ago). There is certainly some degradation in the images made with the converter, although I am not sure that it is evident in the small files I post here. I am pretty convinced that I will get better results with deeper crops (to get similar fields of view) of the files made without the converter than I will using the converter. As you would expect, since it is a 2x converter, the file sizes differ by a factor of two as well.

I’ll need to make a few prints before making a final decision.

6 June 2022

Dragonflies, No Damsels

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 4:15 PM

Early yesterday afternoon I took a walk up the unmaintained section of Brimstone Corner Road with the ode rig in hand. Well, maybe “walk” is the wrong term… “crawl” or “stroll” is probably a better term. It took me roughly two hours to cover maybe two-thirds of a mile. I stopped at every sunny spot along the road looking for odes. I got my aerobic exercise on the return trip as I only took about ten minutes to get back home when I decided to turn around. In the late afternoon, I again succumbed to the siren call of the myriad of odes that were about and roamed the yard for an additional hour.

The temperature was in the upper 60s F and it was breezy. The skies were partly cloudy with lots of fast moving, puffy summer-time clouds.

The most common species present, by far, were chalk-fronted corporals. Every sunny spot on the road had six or more individuals sunning themselves. Next most common were the whitefaces, probably Hudsonian whitefaces, but telling the various whiteface species apart (especially the females) without netting them is beyond my capability. All of the rest of the species I saw (and photographed) were represented by much smaller numbers, in most cases I saw only one or two individuals.

I observed (but did not photograph) only two damselflies the entire time I was out. A female aurora damsel in the early afternoon and a female bluet in the yard. My guess is that it was too windy for the relatively weak flying damsels and that they were all hunkered down as odes do in unsuitable (to them) weather.

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American Emerald (male)?
American Emerald (male)?
Whiteface sp? (female) #1
Whiteface sp? (female) #1
Whiteface sp? (female) #2
Whiteface sp? (female) #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) with Prey #1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) with Prey #1
Spangled Skimmer (female)
Spangled Skimmer (female)
Whiteface sp? (female) #3
Whiteface sp? (female) #3
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) with Prey #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) with Prey #2
Whiteface sp? (female) with Prey
Whiteface sp? (female) with Prey
Unicorn Clubtail (?)
Unicorn Clubtail (?)
Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Stream Cruiser (female)
Stream Cruiser (female)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Common Whitetail female)
Common Whitetail female)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #3
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #3
Chalk-fronted Corporal (female)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (female)
Common Whitetail (imm. male) #1
Common Whitetail (imm. male) #1
Common Whitetail (imm. male) #2
Common Whitetail (imm. male) #2

31 May 2022

Yard Odes at the End of May

Early this afternoon, I noticed numerous dragonflies sunning themselves on our deck. Thus stimulated, I headed out with the camera and made a quick circuit of the yard to see what I could find.

The weather was hot (mid 80s F) and the skies mostly sunny.

Whitefaces, probably Hudsonian Whitefaces, were far the most common ode present. There were a few female chalk-fronted corporals present as well. I also observed a single male Beaverpond Baskettail, an uncommon find.

At one point, while chasing whitefaces, I got briefly distracted by the dozen or so Lady Slippers that are blooming at the edge of our yard. I could not resist adding to the already large number of photos of these show flowers that I have made over the years!

MId-afternoon, Joan called my attention to a damselfly acting strangely on our front steps. It was moving about weakly but clearly could not fly. The photo I made clearly shows why. It was injured. Its head was at a very odd angle to its torso. I made a couple of exposures and then watched for another minute or two until it fell off the steps and into the flower bed.

Late afternoon, while puttering around the yard, I noticed a few damselflies in the patch of ferns on the slope below the garden. Always willing to be distracted by odes, I went a got my camera. There were small numbers of Eastern Forktails (of both sexes) and Sedge Sprites (between my eye and the dim light, it was had to discern sexes) present. Females of both species posed nicely for me.

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Whiteface (sp?) (female)
Whiteface (sp?) (female)
Whiteface (sp?) (female)
Whiteface (sp?) (female)
Chalk0fronted Corporal (female)
Chalk0fronted Corporal (female)
Beaverpond Clubtail (male)
Beaverpond Clubtail (male)
Whiteface Peek-a-boo
Whiteface Peek-a-boo
Whiteface sp? (female)
Whiteface sp? (female)
Hudsonian Whiteface (imm. male)
Hudsonian Whiteface (imm. male)
Lady Slipper
Lady Slipper
Injured Aurora Damsel (male)
Injured Aurora Damsel (male)
Eastern Forktail (female)
Eastern Forktail (female)
Sedge (?) Sprite (female)
Sedge (?) Sprite (female)

29 May 2022

Ashuelot River Odes

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:55 PM

This afternoon I spent several hours looking for odes (dragonflies and damselflies) along the Ashuelot River in Surry, NH. I parked at the Dort Road access point and when I crossed the foot bridge I headed upstream. Although there were some folks enjoying the sun and the water near the bridge, once I walked a few yards upstream I had the river to myself .

The temperature was in the mid 70s F and the skies were mostly cloudy. I covered about three quarters of a mile of river covering both the back channels of the braided section as well as the main channel.

Joan had spent time in this area about a week ago doing a botanical survey. I was interested in this area because she said that the river was swift flowing with a rocky bottom and that she had seen many odes while looking at the flora.

Swift flowing, rocky bottom rivers are not places (ecological niches) I routinely visit. Thus, I was hoping to find species that I rarely see. I was not disappointed.

The most common ode I saw was the Aurora Damsel. They were distributed all along the section of the river I explored (both along the main channel and the back channels) wherever there were patches of grass in full sunlight. Interestingly, I saw only males.

The next most common species I saw were Superb Jewelwings, a new species for me. These were localized to two widely separated sites along the main channel. I observed between six and twelve individuals at each site. The large majority of individuals were female.

I also saw several male Eastern Forktails and three dragonflies, none of which I was able to photograph or identify. Two of the dragonflies were those frustrating types that are in more-or-less continuous flight patrolling territories along the bank of the river.

The third dragonfly I observed was a newly emerged individual on a rock in the middle of one of the secondary channels. I first noticed this individual by picking up an odd glint of light on a rock. A quick look with my binoculars confirmed that the glint was due to the shiny wings of a teneral dragonfly* and several inches away was an exuvia (the empty larval exoskeleton).

Moving cautiously, I attempted to get in position to photograph this insect. However, this was to no avail. Before I could get close enough for even an “insurance shot” for identification this individual fluttered away in typical teneral flight. Alas, I was left with only the exuvia to photograph.

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Superb Jewelwing (female)
Superb Jewelwing (female)
Superb Jewelwing (female)
Superb Jewelwing (female)
Aurora Damsel (male)
Aurora Damsel (male)
Aurora Damsel (male)
Aurora Damsel (male)
Eastern Forktail (male)
Eastern Forktail (male)
Dragonfly Exuvia
Dragonfly Exuvia

* Odes (i.e. dragonflies and damselflies) begin life as eggs deposited in a body of water. The eggs develop into larva which grow and develop as aquatic insects. As the water warms in spring and early summer, the larva crawl from the water and the adult insect emerges from the larva. The newly emerged adult is referred to as teneral. In the teneral state (with wet wings and soft bodies) these insects are very susceptible predation. As soon as their wings are dry enough, a teneral individual flies to a more protected place to continue maturing. This teneral flight, being weak and slow, is very un-dragonfly like.

25 May 2022

Loon Watching — Little Action & Optical Experiments

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 10:30 PM

This afternoon, I headed down to see what was up with the loons. I arrived at my loon watching post right about 4 PM. The weather was pleasant with the temperature around 70 deg. F. It was mostly cloudy but with broken clouds moving at a moderate pace. Thus the light kept changing.

My goal, beside seeing what was up with the loons, was to test out a 2x teleconverter. This device doubles the magnification of a lens but the increase magnification comes at a price. As they say… “There is not such thing as a free lunch.” In this case the price is a decrease in optical quality and, with this particular device, the loss of auto-focus and auto-exposure. One ends up with a camera that operates like cameras did prior to about 1980.

The first photo shown below (made about 4 PM) is a full frame* using the 600 mm lens. The second photo (also a full frame and made a few minutes later) shows the effect of the 2x teleconverter.

Shortly after I added the teleconverter the only loon action I observed this afternoon occurred. The loon stood up briefly and examined the eggs. (They may have turned the eggs, but I am not sure of that.) I made two exposures while the bird was standing. One of these photos (the third photo below) clearly shows the two eggs in the nest. After the loon settled back down, I made a few more exposures with the teleconverter installed before removing it for the rest of the afternoon. I was not willing to compromise photos of any further action until I got the files on my computer and examined them closely**.

As for “further action” this afternoon. There was none! The loon sat on the nest for the next two hours. It looked around regularly and panted*** when the sun came out from behind the clouds but that was it! Such is the life of a nature watcher.

I tried to stay focused on the loons, but at one point I got distracted by light on the wind turbines that are on the ridge above the loon nest. Thus, I briefly pointed my camera just a bit higher than usual.

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first pic of the day (600 mm, no crop) (about 4 PM)
first pic of the day (600 mm, no crop) (about 4 PM)
second pic of the day (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
second pic of the day (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
Turning Two Eggs (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
Turning Two Eggs (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
Settled Down Again (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
Settled Down Again (600 mm + 2x TC, no crop)
Panting (600 mm, typical crop)
Panting (600 mm, typical crop)
Last pic of the day (about 5:55 PM)
Last pic of the day (about 5:55 PM)
Turbine #2
Turbine #2
Turbine #1 (northern most)
Turbine #1 (northern most)

* This image is very modestly cropped from a 2:3 ratio native to the camera to my preferred ratio of 4:5. I crop almost every photo I make to the 4:5 ratio; it just fits my view of the world better. However, most of my photos of the loons on the nest are cropped more severely in order to make a better photograph with the subject more prominent in the frame. The last two loon photos in this series are cropped this way.

** The verdict of my experiment is that I will not be using the teleconverter routinely. The complication of completely manual operation and the moderate loss of image quality are not worth it.

*** Birds, including loons, do not sweat. Rather, in order to cool off in hot weather, they open their mouths and ‘pant’. This allows them to evaporate water from the mucous membranes and thus cools them much as sweat evaporating from a mammal’s skin does.

23 May 2022

Sparse Odes

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 11:00 PM

Late this afternoon, I headed out for a little ode-ing. The temperature was in the upper 60s F, there was a soft breeze and it was mostly cloudy (a high, thin, overcast). Not ideal weather for odes but I went anyway.

I visited three sites. The field adjacent to the Stone Church in Antrim is of interest because there is a small fish-less pond that might support some odes not seen in more common ecological niches. I also stopped at the Contoocook River near the paper mill in Bennington. The river here (below the dam) is fast moving and also represents an interesting (and fairly rare) ecological niche. Lastly, I visited the field near Powder Mill Pond at the Cilley Family Forest in Greenfield (a fairly common environment around here).

I saw very small number of odes at all three sites. At the Antrim site, I saw three or four Eastern forktails (two or three male and a single female), a single female bluet and a single whiteface. The whiteface flew directly at my head which is how I know it had a whiteface but it did not allow an opportunity for further identification before veering off! At the Bennington site, I saw only a single male Eastern forktail in the grass near the canoe launch. I saw no odes on the rocks in the river just below the dam. In Greenfield, I saw (but did not photograph) only a single male dot-tailed whiteface.

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Eastern Forktail (male)
Eastern Forktail (male)
Eastern Forktail (female)
Eastern Forktail (female)
Bluet sp? (female)
Bluet sp? (female)
Fiddlehead
Fiddlehead
Wildflower
Wildflower

Keeping Cool

Filed under: Alternative Processes,Salted-paper Prints — Frank @ 2:00 PM

I spent the last two days keeping cool* in my basement dim room making salted-paper prints and experimenting with gold toning.

In addition to the five new images (shown below), I made larger finished versions (6×7.5 inch image on 8×10 paper) of another five images that I worked on in the recent past.

All of the images shown here are scans from 4×5 inch images on small sheets of Hahnemühle Platinum Rag paper. For the last two images, I show the entire sheet of paper thus revealing the ‘raw’ edges of each image. All of the others are similar but I have cropped them down to show only the image area.

Each image is shown in an un-toned version and a version toned with gold in sodium bicarbonate. It the past I had experimented with a gold-borax toner but I have trouble keeping the borax in solution in my cool work space. Thus, I decided to test out gold-bicarbonate this time.

The difference between the toned and un-toned prints is subtle but significant. Toning cools down the warm tone of the native salted-paper print and increases the contrast slightly.

All of the original exposures were made in either December 2021 or January 2022.

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Window with Vines (gold-toned)
Window with Vines (gold-toned)
Window with Vines
Window with Vines
Window with Steel (gold-toned)
Window with Steel (gold-toned)
Window with Steel
Window with Steel
Naval Prison, Portsmouth, NH (gold-toned)
Naval Prison, Portsmouth, NH (gold-toned)
Naval Prison, Portsmouth, NH
Naval Prison, Portsmouth, NH
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (gold-toned)
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (gold-toned)
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (detail) (gold-toned)
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (detail) (gold-toned)
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (detail)
Battery Farnsworth, New Castle, NH (detail)

* The high both days was near ninety deg. F

20 May 2022

Two Eggs! (Gregg Lake Loons – 2022)

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 1:29 PM

Mid-morning, Joan and I decided to head down to the lake to see if we could confirm that the loon nest contained eggs. While we were getting ready, a single loon flew overhead going towards the lake. The temperature was in the mid-60s F and the skies were changing quickly… mostly cloudy as we headed out and mostly sunny by the time we returned home roughly forty minutes later.

In order to increase Joan’s chances of spotting eggs in the nest, I parked the truck at the side of the narrow road so that she could set up the spotting scope in the bed of the truck… it’s all about angles. I figured (correctly) that there would be little traffic.

Just as we finished setting up (within five minutes of our arrival) we heard the loon on the nest call. We were afraid that maybe the presence of a vehicle parked in an odd spot might have alarmed the bird even though the nest is four or five hundred feet from the road.

Rarely does the wildlife makes the watcher’s life easy, but today was one of those days. Within a few minutes of the first call from the loon on the nest, its mate arrived and loon 1 slipped into the water to greet loon 2. The pair swam around near the nest for a few minutes giving Joan ample time to see that there are indeed two eggs in the nest.

Eventually, one of the birds (presumably the incoming loon) mounted the nest. I was able to make a sequence of exposures that illustrate how ungainly this process is (see the second gallery below). Unusually, the loon stayed on the nest for only a short time before entering the water again.

At this point we decided that we had the ‘data’ we needed the truck for and I moved the truck to the more usual parking area down by the junction of Craig Rd. By the time I walked back to the truck, a loon was back on the nest. The second loon hung around the general area of the nest fishing for several minutes before it headed out under the bridge to the main part of the lake.

Joan took a stroll at this point to see if she could see where the two herons that few by earlier had landed. She did not see the herons but she did observe two loons hanging out together on the main part of the lake… presumably one of the mated pair we were watching and the single bird we heard flying over the house about a half hour earlier?

About forty minutes after we first arrived, we headed back to the house, the garden and the things we are ‘supposed to do”!

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Loon 1 On Nest
Loon 1 On Nest
Loon 2 Approaching Nest
Loon 2 Approaching Nest
Both Loons Near Nest
Both Loons Near Nest
Loon 2 Stretching
Loon 2 Stretching
Loon 2 On Nest
Loon 2 On Nest
Loon 1 Hangin Around #1
Loon 1 Hangin Around #1
Loon 1 Hangin Around #2
Loon 1 Hangin Around #2

Loon Mounting Nest Sequence (about 30 seconds from start to finish)

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Loon Mounting Nest (1 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (1 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (2 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (2 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (3 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (3 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (4 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (4 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (5 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (5 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (6 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (6 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (7 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (7 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (8 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (8 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (9 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (9 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (10 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (10 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (11 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (11 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (12 of 12)
Loon Mounting Nest (12 of 12)

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