Photographs by Frank

15 July 2017

Juvenile Green Herons

Filed under: Birds,Summer,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 5:05 PM

I’m back!*

Yesterday afternoon, just before four, I received a call from Diane (one of my vast network** of wildlife informants). She said that there were four small herons on the mill pond behind Town Hall.

Big Bertha and I arrived as quick as we could and we spent roughly two hours making photographs of a quartet of juvenile green herons. I was unable to get all four in the frame at once; three was the best I could manage.

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Juvenile Green Heron #1
Juvenile Green Heron #1
Juvenile Green Herons #1
Juvenile Green Herons #1
Juvenile Green Heron #2
Juvenile Green Heron #2
Juvenile Green Herons #2
Juvenile Green Herons #2
Juvenile Green Heron #3
Juvenile Green Heron #3
Juvenile Green Herons #3
Juvenile Green Herons #3

* After an unplanned, health-related hiatus.

** OK, so there are only two: Joan and Diane!


 

14 May 2017

Star Island – May 2017

Filed under: Birds,Landscapes,Spring,Wildlife — Tags: , , — Frank @ 11:30 PM

I spent this past Friday and Saturday on Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of New Hampshire and Maine. The trip (which is organized by Eric Masterson) was timed to coincide with the spring migration of birds.

Joan and I went on this trip back in 2014 (see this post for birds and this one for landscapes); this year I went by myself as Joan was occupied with editing the June issue of the Antrim Limrik.

The birding was not as spectacular this year as it was in 2014 but I had a good time anyway. One can always find something to photograph if you spend time looking carefully.

Birds

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Grackle in the Grass
Grackle in the Grass
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Swainson's Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #2
Northern Parula #2
American Robin
American Robin
Mallard
Mallard
Song Sparrow #1
Song Sparrow #1
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Chickadee
Chickadee
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #3
Song Sparrow #3
Tree Swallow #1
Tree Swallow #1
Catbird
Catbird
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Black and White Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Tree Swallow #2
Tree Swallow #2

Other Work – Color

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Surf
Surf
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Caswell Cemetery
Caswell Cemetery
Sunset, Star Island
Sunset, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise Shadow
Sunrise Shadow
Star Island, Early Morning
Star Island, Early Morning
Untitled
Untitled
Authorized Personnel, No Respect
Authorized Personnel, No Respect

Other Work – Black and White

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White Island Light
White Island Light
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Reflection
Reflection
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #2
Gosport Chapel #2
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #2
Art Barn Reflection #2
Untitled #2
Untitled #2

6 April 2017

2017 Trip South

Filed under: Amphibians,Birds,Odontates,Other Insects — Tags: , — Frank @ 3:30 PM

If two years makes a tradition, we headed south after (a snow-delayed*) town meeting for our “traditional” trip south. Our destination this year was the Florida panhandle.

We spent a week camped at the Wright Lake campground in the Apalachicola National Forest. Each day we headed out to explore from this base. We ranged from the Saint Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in the east to the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park in the west. In addition, we hit a number of Florida Birding Trail sites within the National Forest, the Saint George Island State Park and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve  (their Unit 4 tract on St. George Island was particularly productive photographically).

Since we had such a good time last year at the Okefenokee NWR/ Foster State Park in SE Georgia, we stopped there for a day on the way back home. This time we were able to kayak some of the swamp on our own. It was quite an experience sitting low to the water with dozens of alligators all around.

Birds (many IDs needed but in the interest of a timely post, they will be added later)

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Osprey with Fish
Osprey with Fish
Gull
Gull
ID Needed 1
ID Needed 1
Clapper Rail
Clapper Rail
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Crow
Crow
Eastern Towhee
Eastern Towhee
Semipalmated Sandpiper (?)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (?)
Tri-colored Heron with Prey
Tri-colored Heron with Prey
Tri-colored Heron
Tri-colored Heron
Little Blue Heron (immature) and Glossy Ibis
Little Blue Heron (immature) and Glossy Ibis
Pied-billed Grebe
Pied-billed Grebe
American Coot
American Coot
Sora
Sora
Common Moorhen
Common Moorhen
Glossy Ibis
Glossy Ibis
Brown Pelican (immature)
Brown Pelican (immature)
Brown Pelican
Brown Pelican
Sanderling (?)
Sanderling (?)
Willet (?)
Willet (?)
ID Needed 2
ID Needed 2
ID Needed 3
ID Needed 3
ID Needed 4
ID Needed 4
ID Needed 5
ID Needed 5
ID Needed 6
ID Needed 6
Brown Pelican
Brown Pelican
Mockingbird
Mockingbird
ID Needed 7
ID Needed 7
Double Crested Cormorant #1
Double Crested Cormorant #1
Anhinga
Anhinga
Double Crested Cormorant #2
Double Crested Cormorant #2
Laughing Gull #1
Laughing Gull #1
Willet (?)
Willet (?)
Laughing Gull #2
Laughing Gull #2
Laughing Gull #3
Laughing Gull #3
ID Needed 8
ID Needed 8
ID Needed 9
ID Needed 9
ID Needed 10
ID Needed 10
ID Needed 11
ID Needed 11
Little Blue Heron
Little Blue Heron

Other Subjects

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Alligator #1
Alligator #1
Softshell Turtle
Softshell Turtle
Green Anole #1
Green Anole #1
Alligator #2
Alligator #2
Cypress Trees with Anhinga (Okefenokee)
Cypress Trees with Anhinga (Okefenokee)
Alligator #3
Alligator #3
Okefenokee Swamp
Okefenokee Swamp
Florida Slider
Florida Slider
Alligator #4
Alligator #4
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 1
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 1
Spider
Spider
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 2
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 2
Butterfly (ID Needed) 1
Butterfly (ID Needed) 1
Burnt Palmetto
Burnt Palmetto
Butterfly (ID Needed) 2
Butterfly (ID Needed) 2
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 3
Dragonfly (ID Needed) 3
Damselfly (ID Needed) 1
Damselfly (ID Needed) 1
Apalachicola Forest Landscape
Apalachicola Forest Landscape
Green Anole #2
Green Anole #2

* Two feet of snow will do that… even in NH! We arrived back home on the evening of 3 April to find a knee high pile of snow at the end of the drive way (the result of another foot of snow dumped a few days previously). It took about 45 minutes of work with snow blower before we could get the car and camper into the driveway.


 

1 January 2017

Happy New Year

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Wildlife,Winter — Tags: — Frank @ 6:09 PM

Around noon today Joan’s cousin Liz called to say that there was a barred owl sitting, clearly visible from the dining room window, in a tree at the back of her house.

I did what any self-respecting wildlife photographer would do. I headed out the door headed to Liz’s house as soon as I gathered up my gear! Joan came along too.

These two photos were taken from Liz’s bathroom window with my 300 mm lens. The first was made through the storm window and the second after I raised the storm window. The owl was completely unperturbed by my raising either the regular window or the storm window even though it was maybe twenty five feet away.

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Barred Owl Yawn
Barred Owl Yawn
Barred Owl
Barred Owl

23 September 2016

Pack Monadnock Hawk Watch

Filed under: Birds,Early Fall,Monadnock Region,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 11:00 AM

Yesterday, I finally made it up to the Pack Monadnock Hawk Watch… on day 22. And what a day it was, perfect weather and lots of hawks.

I arrived just before noon, the the show started shortly there after and continued until around three. I left about 4:30.

The total was about 2,800 birds, about 2,700 of which were broad-wings. Katrina’s official report can be found here.

The 10,000 birds for the season mark was reached and the traditional group photo around the tally board was made (with Katrina’s camera, but I am sure that it will appear at some point.)

While the bird watching was great, the conditions for photography were not ideal. The raptors were kettling pretty far away; only a few appeared close to the summit. The resident turkey vultures made fairly close approaches at times and I was able to make a few mediocre photos.

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Kettle of Hawks
Kettle of Hawks
Turkey Vulture #1
Turkey Vulture #1
Turkey Vulture #2
Turkey Vulture #2
Turkey Vulture #3
Turkey Vulture #3

 

21 September 2016

Two from Today

Filed under: Birds,Early Fall,Monadnock Region,Odontates,Wildlife — Tags: , , — Frank @ 9:30 PM

Today was a glorious day weather-wise.  The temperature was in the high 70s F, the humidity was low and the skies mostly clear.

While we ate lunch on the deck, we were entertained by the birds at the feeder and by a couple of male autumn meadowhawks perching on the dead flowers nearby. After watching the odes for some time, I finally gave in and got the camera.

Later in the afternoon, Joan headed out for a kayak ride. She called from the beach parking lot to say that there were “brown headed ducks” down by the bridge but that she did not have her binoculars with her so that she did not get a good look at them. I stashed Big Bertha in the passenger seat, threw the tripod in the bed of the truck and headed down the road the mile to the bridge.

Those “brown-headed”ducks turned out to be a family of mallards. I watched and photographed them for about an hour.

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Autumn Meadowhawk (male)
Autumn Meadowhawk (male)
Mallards - youngster, female, male (l-r)
Mallards - youngster, female, male (l-r)

 

26 August 2016

Backyard Birds

Filed under: Birds,Summer,The Yard,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 10:00 PM

Yesterday (i.e Thursday, 25 August), I spent a few hours watching the birds in our backyard. Along with the usual suspects* for this time of year, a few rarer (at least in our yard) birds made their appearances.

At least one red-breasted nuthatch has been making regular visits to the feeders, usually to the sunflower seeds, but occasionally to the suet. Because of the frequency of the visits and the fact that it seems to fly off in the same direction after each brief visit, I suspect that there might actually be a pair of adults attending to young birds in a nest.

I also watched a black and white warbler hunting for insects in the trees near  the feeders; it never approached the feeders. This is the third time in recent days that I have seen this species in our yard and this is the first summer that we have observed them here.

Additionally, a sparrow (of some sort other than a chipping sparrow) made a short appearance near the sunflower seed feeder but it did not approach it.

The hummingbirds have provided some great entertainment over the past week or so, there are four or five individuals (a family consisting of an adult pair and two or three juveniles, I think), they frequent both the feeder and a nearby butterfly bush. Their incredible speed and agility in flight as they chase each other around the yard, makes them great fun to watch. I only try to photograph them when they stop to perch nearby.

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Goldfinch
Goldfinch
Mourning Dove
Mourning Dove
Downy Woodpecker (female)
Downy Woodpecker (female)
Chipping Sparrow (male)
Chipping Sparrow (male)
Black and White Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Sparrow
Sparrow
Goldfinch (juvenile?)
Goldfinch (juvenile?)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (juvenile)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (juvenile)

* Two types of woodpeckers (downy and hairy; we’ve seen only one red-bellied in the past few weeks), titmice, chickadees, white-breasted nuthatches, goldfinches, mourning doves, chipping sparrows and hummingbirds.


 

13 August 2016

Other Birds

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Summer,The Yard,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 11:59 PM

Although I spent the majority of my time today with the camera pointed at the humming bird feeder, I did, occasionally, point it elsewhere.

Goldfinches and tufted titmice are the most common birds around the feeders these days. Woodpeckers (both downy and hairy) were also common; I did not see a red-bellied woodpecker today. A variety of other birds appeared in small numbers. In addition to the phoebe and the mourning dove I made photographs of, I also observed a couple of blue jays and a number of chickadees.

I think that the chickadees are a sign that autumn is coming. We have lots of chickadees at the feeder all winter and early spring. However, at some point in the spring, they disappear. I am guessing that they must not breed nearby the house. Over the past few weeks small numbers of chickadees are reappearing at the feeder. Maybe because their breeding season is over?

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Tufted Titmouse #1
Tufted Titmouse #1
Hairy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
American Goldfinch (male)
American Goldfinch (male)
American Goldfinch (female)
American Goldfinch (female)
Hairy Woodpecker (juvenile male)
Hairy Woodpecker (juvenile male)
Eastern Phoebe (juvenile)
Eastern Phoebe (juvenile)
Mourning Dove
Mourning Dove
American Goldfinch (female) with Seed
American Goldfinch (female) with Seed
Tufted Titmouse #2
Tufted Titmouse #2

 

22 June 2016

Olive-sided Flycatchers

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Summer — Tags: — Frank @ 6:00 PM

Joan’s cousin Suzy arrived at her summer place to find an olive-sided flycatcher nest on the beams that support her deck.

I took the opportunity to make a few photos of the adults as they came and went from the nest.

I only spent ten minutes on this “stakeout” since the adults seemed to delay going to the nest even though I was twenty-five or thirty feet away from the nest and the adults.

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Olive-sided Flycatcher #1
Olive-sided Flycatcher #1
Olive-sided Flycatcher #2
Olive-sided Flycatcher #2
Olive-sided Flycatcher #3
Olive-sided Flycatcher #3

 

12 June 2016

A Cool and Cloudy Afternoon

Filed under: Amphibians,Birds,Mammals,Summer,The Yard,Wildlife — Tags: , — Frank @ 1:58 PM

Yesterday was cool (it never reached 60 deg. F), cloudy and damp (there were sporadic showers in the morning)… in other words the odes were not flying. Thus, I turned my attention (and lens) to birds and I staked out the feeders for a few hours in the afternoon.

The damp weather brings out the red efts and yesterday was no exception. There were half a dozen in the small patch of lawn behind the house.  As usual there were chipmunks and squirrels scavenging what they could from the bird feeders.

The usual feeder birds were present, among them were a female rose-breasted grosbeak, a male goldfinch and a number of tufted titmice. None of which presented themselves well for photography.

Also present (and photographed) were what seem to be a pair of downy woodpeckers, a hairy woodpecker, at least one male ruby-throated hummingbird and a lone turkey.

The turkey has been a regular visitor to our yard for the past few weeks. I’m no expert, but I would hazard a guess that it is either a female that did not nest or a immature male looking for a territory.

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Red Eft
Red Eft
Eastern Chipmunck
Eastern Chipmunck
Downy Woodpecker (female)
Downy Woodpecker (female)
Wild Turkey
Wild Turkey
Downy Woodpecker (male)
Downy Woodpecker (male)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (male)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (male)

 

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