Photographs by Frank

24 March 2019

Sugaring

Filed under: Early Spring,Monadnock Region — Frank @ 6:15 PM

March is prime time if you are in the maple syrup business. The sap is flowing and folks are boiling more-or-less constantly.

This weekend a number of local sugar houses were open for “tours”. I put tours in quotes since most sugar houses are small structures and thus a “tour” consists of maybe eight or ten people at maximum standing in a circle around the evaporator.

Joan and I took a break from our regular activities this afternoon and visited two Antrim sugar houses.

I, of course, took my camera along.

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Steam Rising
Steam Rising
The Boil
The Boil
Charlie Tending The Boil
Charlie Tending The Boil
What Fuels It All
What Fuels It All
Sap House Window
Sap House Window
The Boil #2
The Boil #2
Tending The Boil
Tending The Boil

16 March 2019

The M’s of March

Filed under: Landscapes,March,Monadnock Region — Frank @ 12:30 PM

Most folks associate March with “Madness”. For me, March is associated with three other “M words”… Maple, Mud and Meeting. Maple as in maple sap/syrup. Mud as in mud season. Meeting as in Town Meeting. This past week we have had all three of these “M words”.

Yesterday afternoon, I went for a walk. At the end of our driveway, I had a choice… left and the mud of the “civilized” section of the road or right and the slush of the un-maintained section of our road. I opted for the slush.

Of course, I took my camera with me.

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Stone Wall Detail #1
Stone Wall Detail #1
Birch Emerging from the Snow
Birch Emerging from the Snow
Granite and Ice
Granite and Ice
Stone Wall Detail #2
Stone Wall Detail #2
Jane's Barn
Jane's Barn
Untitled
Untitled
Living and Dead #1
Living and Dead #1
Living and Dead #2
Living and Dead #2

9 March 2019

A Walk on the Lake, Part 1: Bob House Details

Filed under: architecture,Monadnock Region,Winter — Frank @ 7:00 PM

Yesterday afternoon was warm (just about freezing) and sunny, perfect for a walk on the lake. There are about half a dozen bob houses out on the lake (and a couple more on the shore by the boat ramp).

To my eye, the structures per se do not make particularly interesting photographs, particularly in the harsh late winter sun. However, there were many details that caught my eye.

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Icicles #1
Icicles #1
Icicles #2
Icicles #2
Icicles #3
Icicles #3
Stove Pipe #1
Stove Pipe #1
Stove Pipe #2
Stove Pipe #2
Stove Pipe #3
Stove Pipe #3
Stove Pipe #4
Stove Pipe #4
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Truth in Advertising?
Truth in Advertising?
Untitled #2
Untitled #2

5 March 2019

A Day on the Lake

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Winter — Frank @ 10:00 PM

Last Friday (1 March) , we spent most of the day on the lake… literally. The ice is about twenty inches thick.

We headed out before 11 AM and did not get back to the house until almost 4:30. We, there was a group of five of us, spent the day laying out guides and pulling a ground penetrating radar (GPR) apparatus across the ice in order to map the geology of the lake bottom. This was our second GPR session and a third is planned for this coming Thursday.

Of course, I carried my camera and made a few photographs while out and about.

Here they are:

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GPR Rig In Action
GPR Rig In Action
Lake Shore (two frame pano)
Lake Shore (two frame pano)
Lake Shore
Lake Shore
Lake Shore Detail
Lake Shore Detail
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Untitled #2
Untitled #2
Untitled #3
Untitled #3
Bob House #1
Bob House #1
Bob House #2
Bob House #2

10 February 2019

Harsh February Light

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Winter — Frank @ 9:59 PM

In some ways we have had typical New Hampshire winter weather… periods of dull drab days and periods of bright, cloudless blue skies. What has not been typical are the multiple periods of warm weather. In the “old days” we would get a January thaw. These days we seem to get a thaw every few weeks.

The latest thaw was a couple of days in the middle of last week. The mud in the road was deep and spring-like. The road crew worked hard to keep it passable.

The last few days have been more typical of February, highs in the mid- to upper 20s F and lows in the low teens. The days have been bright and sunny… good for production by our new solar panels but challenging for photography. I have persisted none-the-less.

The first three photos were made in the last week, with a regular lens. The last six photos were made yesterday using a $20 “Holga lens” that I recently bought on an impulse. This 60 mm lens is all plastic and has a fixed aperture (f/8). Focusing is all manual and rather crude; there are small pictographs along the focus ring to indicate the distance. The resulting photos, all made in harsh February light, have “character”.

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Church Detail (Salisbury, NH)
Church Detail (Salisbury, NH)
Bend in the Road
Bend in the Road
Stone Wall Detail
Stone Wall Detail
Barn Roof
Barn Roof
Stone Wall
Stone Wall
Birches and Stone Wall
Birches and Stone Wall
Mill (Harrisville, NH)
Mill (Harrisville, NH)
Chesham Depot (long inactive)
Chesham Depot (long inactive)
Barn and Flag
Barn and Flag

21 November 2018

Serious Snow — Early

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Frank @ 10:00 PM

Back when I first moved to New Hampshire, forty odd years ago (1976 to be exact), we often got our first serious snow before Thanksgiving. The ground was then snow covered until spring. These days, with the warming climate, serious snow in November is a rare event.

This year is shaping up to be one of those rare years. We have had about ten or twelve inches of snow in the past few days. The ground is well covered and it is likely to stay that way until spring. We will see.

This morning, we awoke to the usual gray November skies. At least there was no snow falling.  Mid-morning, I took the camera with me as I headed to town to pick up our Thanksgiving bird. As I headed out, there were faint traces of blue sky starting to appear. By the time I headed home (maybe forty five minutes later), the clouds had broken and the sun was shining nicely. I was able to use my camera to good advantage. Alas, the break in the November gray was transitory. More clouds rolled back in within the hour.

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Our deck, yesterday
Our deck, yesterday
Gregg Lake
Gregg Lake
Snowy Tree
Snowy Tree
Hattie Brown Brook, Winter
Hattie Brown Brook, Winter
Winter Woods #1
Winter Woods #1
Winter Woods #2
Winter Woods #2
Winter Woods #3
Winter Woods #3
Winter Woods #4
Winter Woods #4


 

10 November 2018

Random Photos

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 10:07 PM

I often carry a camera with me as I go about my day-to-day activities. Sometimes I even activate the shutter release!

These photos were all made in the month or so since we returned from our road trip. During yesterday’s rain, I remembered to take the memory card out of the camera and see what had accumulated.

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Roadside Oddity #9
Roadside Oddity #9
Autumn Cascade
Autumn Cascade
Autumn Leaves
Autumn Leaves
October Skies
October Skies
Untitled
Untitled
Pumpkin
Pumpkin
Fungi
Fungi
Morning Light
Morning Light


 

22 August 2018

A Jaunt in the “Neighborhood”

This afternoon, I headed out on a walk down Hattie Brown Road, just to see what was up. I had not been out that way in probably almost a month. Weather-wise there were broken clouds and the temperature in the mid-70’s. There was also a nice breeze blowing… nice because it kept the mosquitoes down.

As I left the house, I noticed a small (a couple of dozen individuals) feeding swarm of darners over the yard. Feeding swarms are large congregations (dozens to hundreds of individuals) of big dragonflies (usually a mix of darner species) that gather over open spaces to feed on small flying insects. Feeding swarms form most often in late summer and in the late afternoon. I paused only briefly to watch the swarm before driving down to the bridge.

As I walked out Hattie Brown Road, the sun kept peaking out of the clouds and I saw both female autumn meadowhawks and spreadwings in some of the patches of sunlight along the road. I also saw an occasional darner cruising the road well above head height.

When I reached the beaver pond, the birds took noticed. A crow perched high in a nearby tree, being a social bird, began to call loudly announcing my presence to its compatriots. A great blue heron, being a solitary sort, silently took flight from its fishing spot near the road and headed to the other side of the pond.

As I arrived at the pond, I noticed a large dark cloud come over the ridge to the west and within a minute or two it began to rain lightly. Unsurprisingly, there were no odes to be seen.  Since there was only gray sky to the west and the patches of blue to the east were rapidly receding.  I decided to head back towards the truck without dallying. It rained lightly the entire walk back.

Of course, just as I arrived back at the truck the sun began to reappear and after a short interval the rain stopped.

Since the weather was looking better, I stopped at the road into the Harris Center property along Brimstone Corner Road rather than heading directly home. Parking near the gate, I walked down this road as far as the beaver dam and observed small numbers of the same odes as I saw on Hattie Brown Road. There were a couple of darners patrolling the road, a few spreadwings in sunny spots along the road and a couple of female meadowhawks at the log landing. I saw no odes out over the beaver pond itself.

Eventually, I lost the nice light as the sun disappeared over the ridge to the west. Thus, I headed back up the hill to the truck and arrived back home at 6:30, a bit more than two hours after I departed. The feeding swarm in the yard was gone.

As you might expect, I took a few photos while I was out!

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Spreadwing #1
Spreadwing #1
Wildflower
Wildflower
Autumn Meadowhawk (female)
Autumn Meadowhawk (female)
Grass Seedhead
Grass Seedhead
Toadstool
Toadstool
Spreadwing #2
Spreadwing #2


 

18 August 2018

Morning Visitor

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Summer,The Yard,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 9:59 AM

One the the large oak trees down by the road has a large dead branch that overlooks Joan’s vegetable garden. Semi-regularly we see birds of prey, usually hawks sitting in this branch.

This morning, while eating breakfast, Joan noticed a hawk perched in “the branch”. I made a few exposures from the driveway before it decided to head off.

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Hawk #1
Hawk #1
Hawk #2
Hawk #2


 

22 July 2018

Down Back on Friday

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Summer — Tags: , — Frank @ 12:00 PM

Friday afternoon, I spent a couple hours in the beaver-made wetland “down back” behind our house; we share this wetland with the NH Audubon Willard Pond sanctuary. The weather was warm (about 80 deg. F), very sunny and only a slight breeze.

There were a few darners flying out over the wet meadow; the first I’ve seen this season. The most common dragonfly was the frosted whiteface. There were dozens, mostly patrolling out of the open water of the pond. Additionally, I saw a single male calico pennant, a single male emerald. A Kennedy’s emerald I think, I have seen one other of these a few years back at the mill pond on the Willard Pond sanctuary, about three-quarters of a mile away. I also saw two or three female spangled skimmers.

There were small numbers of damselflies down low in the vegetation. These are always difficult to photograph. Damselflies tend to perch for only short intervals and finding clear “windows” in the vegetation though which to photograph is not easy. The most common damselflies were the sprites, both sphagnum and sedge sprites were present. Additionally, I saw one or two bluets of some sort and a similar number of spreadwings none of which I photographed.

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Sedge Sprite (tandem pair)
Sedge Sprite (tandem pair)
Sphagnum Sprite (male)
Sphagnum Sprite (male)
Frosted Whiteface (male)
Frosted Whiteface (male)
Calico Pennant (male)
Calico Pennant (male)
Spangled Skimmer (female)
Spangled Skimmer (female)
Emerald, male, probably a Kennedy's)
Emerald, male, probably a Kennedy's)
Spangled Skimmer (female)
Spangled Skimmer (female)


 

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