Photographs by Frank

12 June 2018

Lady Slippers

Filed under: Audubon Sanctuaries,Monadnock Region,Spring,wildflowers — Tags: — Frank @ 12:00 PM

Mid-June is peak season for lady slippers here in the Monadnock region.  These showy flowers are fairly rare and, at most sites where they grow, the number of individual plants is, in my experience, small. However, along the Mill Pond trail at New Hampshire Audubon’s Willard Pond Sanctuary there is a “grove” consisting of dozens of these plants in a relatively small area. Yesterday afternoon, I payed a visit to this wonderful spot to make a few photographs.

These flowers are growing under a relatively heavy canopy which creates dappled sunlight. I spent some time crawling around on my hands an knees looking for the right combination of light on a flower and relatively dark background. (All of these photos are in natural light.)

At one point during my crawl, I noticed how many of the leaves around are coated in pine pollen; as is my truck. (Mid-June is flowering time for our pine trees as well.) I took a short break from the flowers at one point when I noticed “nice light” on a pollen covered basswood leaf.

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Lady Slipper #1
Lady Slipper #1
Lady Slipper #2
Lady Slipper #2
Lady Slipper #3
Lady Slipper #3
Lady Slipper #4
Lady Slipper #4
Lady Slipper #5
Lady Slipper #5
Basswood Leaf with Pine Pollen
Basswood Leaf with Pine Pollen

 

10 June 2018

Four Species in Twelve Feet

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring,wildflowers — Tags: , — Frank @ 7:00 PM

During my walk this morning, I stopped at a sunny spot along a forest road to see what odes were present. Sunny spots in a wooded landscape are “hot spots” that concentrate odes.

The road is roughly eight feet wide and the sunny spot was roughly twelve feet long.

I was able to photograph four species of dragonflies in the small area: hudsonian whiteface, chalk-fronted corporal, racket-tailed emerald and one that I have not identified yet*. There were small numbers (3-6) individuals of the first two species and single individuals of the last two species in this small patch of sunlight.

As it was yesterday, chalk-fronted corporals were abundant along the road with small numbers of hudsonian whitefaces also present.

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Hudsonian Whiteface
Hudsonian Whiteface
Racket-tailed Emerald
Racket-tailed Emerald
Hudsomian Whiteface (maturing male)
Hudsomian Whiteface (maturing male)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #2
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Clover
Clover

* An immature male frosted whiteface. Thanks to Nick et al. from the NEOdes mailing list for the ID.


 

8 June 2018

Small Critters

This morning, after an absence of almost two weeks*, I took a walk up the unmaintained section of Brimstone Corner Road just to see what was around.

Ode-wise, the most common species were still the “early birds”… Hudsonian whitefaces (yellow individuals only) and chalk-fronted corporals (of both sexes). The numbers were small about six whitefaces and a dozen corporals in the three miles I walked.

I also observed a single brown-grey damselfly (probably a female bluet of some sort) and a female racket-tailed emerald.

There were a number of other small critters about. That is, besides the black flies and the mosquitoes (although neither of these were present in numbers large enough to be bothersome). I saw two red efts and a small (about the length of the first joint of my thumb) wood frog. Small numbers of at least three species of butterflies and one moth were also out and about.

Plant-wise, the spring ephemerals (trillium, etc.) are gone but a number of small summer flowers are in bloom or just about to open up.

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Hudsonian Whiteface
Hudsonian Whiteface
Red Eft
Red Eft
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male)
Wood Frog
Wood Frog
Chalk-fronted Corporal #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal #3
Chalk-fronted Corporal #3
Butterfly #1
Butterfly #1
Wildflower
Wildflower
Moth
Moth
Butterfly #2
Butterfly #2
Racket-tailed Emerald
Racket-tailed Emerald

* I spent ten days in Maryland visiting my mother who is in a rehab facility after breaking both a wrist and a hip.


 

22 May 2018

Rainy Day Colors

Filed under: architecture,Garden Flowers,Monadnock Region,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 6:00 PM

After finishing my errands this morning, I took a stroll (with camera in hand) around downtown Peterborough in a light rain.

The light was dull and flat, it was not a day for black and white photos, but the rain did make the colors really pop!

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Blue Spokes
Blue Spokes
Once Blue
Once Blue
Spring Flower #1
Spring Flower #1
Spring Flower #2
Spring Flower #2
Colorful Detail #1
Colorful Detail #1
Colorful Detail #2
Colorful Detail #2
Colorful Detail #3`
Colorful Detail #3`
Colorful Detail #4
Colorful Detail #4
Fixed!
Fixed!
Traffic Cone
Traffic Cone
Flammable Gas
Flammable Gas
Life Is Good, Etc.
Life Is Good, Etc.

 

19 May 2018

Ode Season Progression

The ode season progresses.

The hudsonian whitefaces are maturing. Both males and females emerge with yellow and black markings. As the males mature the yellow spots turn red. Yesterday, about one in ten of the hudsonian whitefaces I saw were red or reddish.

Hudsonian whitefaces were still, by far, the most common ode around. However, small numbers of chalk-fronted corporals and brownish-grey damselflies (most probably a bluet of some sort) have appeared in the past few days.

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Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Bluet (female)
Bluet (female)
Female Bluet with Prey
Female Bluet with Prey
Chalk-fronted Corporal
Chalk-fronted Corporal

While prowling the “neighborhood” with a camera set up to make close up photos of smallish insects, I often find other things to point my lens at… other insects (especially butterflies) and flowers (of both wild and garden ilk) are most common.

Yesterday, while I was kneeling near a stone wall stalking a chalk-fronted corporal, a chipmunk poked its head out from between two stones. He was a very curious “fellow”*. Every time I moved he would duck back into the crevice, but after a few seconds he would reappear. I was close enough to photograph him without taking the extension tube from between my camera and lens.

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Wild Strawberry Flowers
Wild Strawberry Flowers
Butterfly
Butterfly
Tulip with Visitor
Tulip with Visitor
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #2
Fancy Daffodils #2
Tulip
Tulip
Curious Chipmunk
Curious Chipmunk

* I say “fellow”, but I did not see enough of this individual to actually determine its sex.

13 May 2018

Ode Opener 2018

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring — Tags: — Frank @ 9:00 PM

Over the past few days, I have been watching the appearance of increasing numbers of Hudsonian whitefaces in the yard and on the road. There were a scattered few last Monday. Today, there were dozens. (Today, I also observed, but did not identify or photograph, a single damselfly.)

Hooray… Ode season is upon us!!!

This afternoon, I dusted off the ode rig and spent a bit of time brushing up on my ode photography skills. Those skills were rusty, but the kinks worked themselves out quickly.

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Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #9
Hudsonian Whiteface #9

 

24 April 2018

Spring Runoff Redux

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:30 PM

This afternoon I took a walk in the woods behind our house. My goal was to visit (and photograph)  two small woodland streams,

The nearest one (about a quarter mile from the house) was a bust. Too little flow and too much light (contrast).

The second (about another half mile along) panned out well. Just the right combination of flow and light.

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Vernal Flow #1
Vernal Flow #1
Vernal Flow #2
Vernal Flow #2
Vernal Flow #3
Vernal Flow #3
Vernal Flow #4
Vernal Flow #4

 

14 May 2017

Star Island – May 2017

Filed under: Birds,Landscapes,Spring,Wildlife — Tags: , , — Frank @ 11:30 PM

I spent this past Friday and Saturday on Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of New Hampshire and Maine. The trip (which is organized by Eric Masterson) was timed to coincide with the spring migration of birds.

Joan and I went on this trip back in 2014 (see this post for birds and this one for landscapes); this year I went by myself as Joan was occupied with editing the June issue of the Antrim Limrik.

The birding was not as spectacular this year as it was in 2014 but I had a good time anyway. One can always find something to photograph if you spend time looking carefully.

Birds

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Grackle in the Grass
Grackle in the Grass
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Swainson's Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #2
Northern Parula #2
American Robin
American Robin
Mallard
Mallard
Song Sparrow #1
Song Sparrow #1
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Chickadee
Chickadee
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #3
Song Sparrow #3
Tree Swallow #1
Tree Swallow #1
Catbird
Catbird
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Black and White Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Tree Swallow #2
Tree Swallow #2

Other Work – Color

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Surf
Surf
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Caswell Cemetery
Caswell Cemetery
Sunset, Star Island
Sunset, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise Shadow
Sunrise Shadow
Star Island, Early Morning
Star Island, Early Morning
Untitled
Untitled
Authorized Personnel, No Respect
Authorized Personnel, No Respect

Other Work – Black and White

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White Island Light
White Island Light
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Reflection
Reflection
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #2
Gosport Chapel #2
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #2
Art Barn Reflection #2
Untitled #2
Untitled #2

22 June 2016

Weekend Odes at the Lake

Filed under: "Camp",Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 6:30 PM

The weather was hot (for NH) and humid last weekend (18 and 19 Jun). We headed down to the lake and our camp for both afternoons. I spent most of the time we were there odeing.

Both days there was lots of evidence of damselfly emergence… teneral bluets were the most common ode I encountered and I even found a few damselfly exuvia.

Interestingly, on Saturday, there were many lancet clubtails present. However, on Sunday, I saw very few despite the conditions and the time of day begin similar. I have no idea why.

Photos from Saturday

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Bluet Pair in Tandem
Bluet Pair in Tandem
Teneral Damselfly (possibly a variable dancer)
Teneral Damselfly (possibly a variable dancer)
Damselfly Exuvia
Damselfly Exuvia
Clubtail sp.
Clubtail sp.
Dragonfly Exuvia
Dragonfly Exuvia
Lancet Clubtail (?) with Prey
Lancet Clubtail (?) with Prey
Teneral Damselfly
Teneral Damselfly
Lancet Clubtail
Lancet Clubtail

 

Photos from Sunday

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Bluet sp.
Bluet sp.
Dragonfly Exuvia #1
Dragonfly Exuvia #1
Damselfly Exuvia
Damselfly Exuvia
Teneral Damselfly #1
Teneral Damselfly #1
Teneral Damselfly #2
Teneral Damselfly #2
Dragonfly Exuvia #2
Dragonfly Exuvia #2

 

19 May 2016

Late Evening Sky

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Spring — Frank @ 4:00 PM

On Tuesday, as I was taking in the bird feeders*, I noticed the almost full moon peaking through the just leafing out oak tree in the front yard. Of course, I went a got my camera.

The moon was only visible for short intervals as it was quite cloudy. Thus, after photographing the moon though the branches, I turned my attention (and lens) to the clouds themselves.

All of these photos were taken about twenty minutes after the sun had set.

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Moon Through Early Oak Leaves
Moon Through Early Oak Leaves
Late Evening Sky #1
Late Evening Sky #1
Late Evening Sky #2
Late Evening Sky #2
Late Evening Sky #3
Late Evening Sky #3

* The bird feeders are stowed away in the garage every night in order to not attract the neighborhood bears.


 

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