Photographs by Frank

19 May 2018

Ode Season Progression

The ode season progresses.

The hudsonian whitefaces are maturing. Both males and females emerge with yellow and black markings. As the males mature the yellow spots turn red. Yesterday, about one in ten of the hudsonian whitefaces I saw were red or reddish.

Hudsonian whitefaces were still, by far, the most common ode around. However, small numbers of chalk-fronted corporals and brownish-grey damselflies (most probably a bluet of some sort) have appeared in the past few days.

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Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Bluet (female)
Bluet (female)
Female Bluet with Prey
Female Bluet with Prey
Chalk-fronted Corporal
Chalk-fronted Corporal

While prowling the “neighborhood” with a camera set up to make close up photos of smallish insects, I often find other things to point my lens at… other insects (especially butterflies) and flowers (of both wild and garden ilk) are most common.

Yesterday, while I was kneeling near a stone wall stalking a chalk-fronted corporal, a chipmunk poked its head out from between two stones. He was a very curious “fellow”*. Every time I moved he would duck back into the crevice, but after a few seconds he would reappear. I was close enough to photograph him without taking the extension tube from between my camera and lens.

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Wild Strawberry Flowers
Wild Strawberry Flowers
Butterfly
Butterfly
Tulip with Visitor
Tulip with Visitor
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #2
Fancy Daffodils #2
Tulip
Tulip
Curious Chipmunk
Curious Chipmunk

* I say “fellow”, but I did not see enough of this individual to actually determine its sex.

13 May 2018

Ode Opener 2018

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring — Tags: — Frank @ 9:00 PM

Over the past few days, I have been watching the appearance of increasing numbers of Hudsonian whitefaces in the yard and on the road. There were a scattered few last Monday. Today, there were dozens. (Today, I also observed, but did not identify or photograph, a single damselfly.)

Hooray… Ode season is upon us!!!

This afternoon, I dusted off the ode rig and spent a bit of time brushing up on my ode photography skills. Those skills were rusty, but the kinks worked themselves out quickly.

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Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #9
Hudsonian Whiteface #9

 

24 April 2018

Spring Runoff Redux

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 11:30 PM

This afternoon I took a walk in the woods behind our house. My goal was to visit (and photograph)  two small woodland streams,

The nearest one (about a quarter mile from the house) was a bust. Too little flow and too much light (contrast).

The second (about another half mile along) panned out well. Just the right combination of flow and light.

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Vernal Flow #1
Vernal Flow #1
Vernal Flow #2
Vernal Flow #2
Vernal Flow #3
Vernal Flow #3
Vernal Flow #4
Vernal Flow #4

 

14 May 2017

Star Island – May 2017

Filed under: Birds,Landscapes,Spring,Wildlife — Tags: , , — Frank @ 11:30 PM

I spent this past Friday and Saturday on Star Island, one of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of New Hampshire and Maine. The trip (which is organized by Eric Masterson) was timed to coincide with the spring migration of birds.

Joan and I went on this trip back in 2014 (see this post for birds and this one for landscapes); this year I went by myself as Joan was occupied with editing the June issue of the Antrim Limrik.

The birding was not as spectacular this year as it was in 2014 but I had a good time anyway. One can always find something to photograph if you spend time looking carefully.

Birds

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Grackle in the Grass
Grackle in the Grass
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Swainson's Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #1
Northern Parula #2
Northern Parula #2
American Robin
American Robin
Mallard
Mallard
Song Sparrow #1
Song Sparrow #1
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Authorized Personnel? (Tree Swallows)
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Gulls Standing Gaurd
Chickadee
Chickadee
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #2
Song Sparrow #3
Song Sparrow #3
Tree Swallow #1
Tree Swallow #1
Catbird
Catbird
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #1
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Red-breasted Nuthatch #2
Black and White Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Tree Swallow #2
Tree Swallow #2

Other Work – Color

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Surf
Surf
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Sunrise, Smuttynose Island
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Gulls Mob Lobstermen
Caswell Cemetery
Caswell Cemetery
Sunset, Star Island
Sunset, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise, Star Island
Sunrise Shadow
Sunrise Shadow
Star Island, Early Morning
Star Island, Early Morning
Untitled
Untitled
Authorized Personnel, No Respect
Authorized Personnel, No Respect

Other Work – Black and White

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White Island Light
White Island Light
Untitled #1
Untitled #1
Reflection
Reflection
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Song Sparrow Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Grackle Silhouette
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #1
Gosport Chapel #2
Gosport Chapel #2
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #1
Art Barn Reflection #2
Art Barn Reflection #2
Untitled #2
Untitled #2

22 June 2016

Weekend Odes at the Lake

Filed under: "Camp",Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 6:30 PM

The weather was hot (for NH) and humid last weekend (18 and 19 Jun). We headed down to the lake and our camp for both afternoons. I spent most of the time we were there odeing.

Both days there was lots of evidence of damselfly emergence… teneral bluets were the most common ode I encountered and I even found a few damselfly exuvia.

Interestingly, on Saturday, there were many lancet clubtails present. However, on Sunday, I saw very few despite the conditions and the time of day begin similar. I have no idea why.

Photos from Saturday

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Bluet Pair in Tandem
Bluet Pair in Tandem
Teneral Damselfly (possibly a variable dancer)
Teneral Damselfly (possibly a variable dancer)
Damselfly Exuvia
Damselfly Exuvia
Clubtail sp.
Clubtail sp.
Dragonfly Exuvia
Dragonfly Exuvia
Lancet Clubtail (?) with Prey
Lancet Clubtail (?) with Prey
Teneral Damselfly
Teneral Damselfly
Lancet Clubtail
Lancet Clubtail

 

Photos from Sunday

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Bluet sp.
Bluet sp.
Dragonfly Exuvia #1
Dragonfly Exuvia #1
Damselfly Exuvia
Damselfly Exuvia
Teneral Damselfly #1
Teneral Damselfly #1
Teneral Damselfly #2
Teneral Damselfly #2
Dragonfly Exuvia #2
Dragonfly Exuvia #2

 

19 May 2016

Late Evening Sky

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Spring — Frank @ 4:00 PM

On Tuesday, as I was taking in the bird feeders*, I noticed the almost full moon peaking through the just leafing out oak tree in the front yard. Of course, I went a got my camera.

The moon was only visible for short intervals as it was quite cloudy. Thus, after photographing the moon though the branches, I turned my attention (and lens) to the clouds themselves.

All of these photos were taken about twenty minutes after the sun had set.

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Moon Through Early Oak Leaves
Moon Through Early Oak Leaves
Late Evening Sky #1
Late Evening Sky #1
Late Evening Sky #2
Late Evening Sky #2
Late Evening Sky #3
Late Evening Sky #3

* The bird feeders are stowed away in the garage every night in order to not attract the neighborhood bears.


 

16 May 2016

Mid-May Bird Report

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Spring — Tags: — Frank @ 4:00 PM

Spring birds continue to arrive.

Along with the year-round residents (chickadees, nuthatches, woodpeckers, etc.) and the early arrivals (goldfinches and purple finches), we have had rose-breasted grosbeaks at the feeders for roughly ten days. The males seemed to appear about four or five days before the females.

On Saturday (14 May) we observed our first hummingbird of the season (a male; we’ve seen no females yet).

We also saw a single Baltimore oriole on each day of the weekend. We’ve not had orioles around the house before. Hopefully the feeder I bought and hung out this morning will entice them to stay.

Other folks in the “neighborhood” (the closest about a mile and a half away) have said that they have had indigo buntings at their feeders. Alas, we have not seen any in our yard.

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Rose-breasted Grosbeak (male)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (male)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (female)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (female)
Bluejay
Bluejay
American Goldfinch (female)
American Goldfinch (female)
Purple Finch (male)
Purple Finch (male)
White-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Black-capped Chickadee
Black-capped Chickadee

 

20 April 2016

Spring Birds

Filed under: Birds,Spring,The Yard,Wildlife — Tags: — Frank @ 12:00 PM

Monday (18 Apr) afternoon was warm and sunny. I spent a few hours watching (and photographing) the backyard birds.

In addition to the year-rounders (nuthatches, chickadees, titmice and woodpeckers) a number of returning migrants have appeared. There were good numbers of American goldfinches, sometimes as many as a dozen or so at one time. I am always amazed at the brilliance of the yellow coloring of the males at this time of year. Smaller numbers of purple finches were also present.

Small flocks of juncos (eight or ten) came and went all afternoon. I am unable to get a sense of what stimulates the entire flock to make an exodus. When they leave en mass they seem to startle everyone else (including me!) and often cause all of the finches to flee as well.

Lastly, I saw two singletons… a red-breasted nuthatch (which I did not photograph) and a chipping sparrow.

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White-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Purple Finch (male)
Purple Finch (male)
Downy Woodpecker (male)
Downy Woodpecker (male)
Purple Finch (female)
Purple Finch (female)
Black-capped Chickadee
Black-capped Chickadee
American Goldfinch (female)
American Goldfinch (female)
White-breasted Nuthatch#2
White-breasted Nuthatch#2
Purple Finch (male) #2
Purple Finch (male) #2
Dark-eyed Junco
Dark-eyed Junco
Chipping Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow

 

30 March 2016

Spring Break Road Trip, Part 3

Filed under: Birds,National Wildlife Refuges,Odontates,Spring,Wildlife — Frank @ 4:00 PM

On the 2oth, we pointed the car north and headed for Georgia, specifically the Stephen Foster State Park within the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge.

Arriving in the late afternoon, we were treated to hordes of dragonflies in and around the campground. We had seen small numbers of odes here-and-there in Florida, but they were out in full force in Georgia.

The next morning, we took the boat tour out into the swamp offered by the park. They have kayaks for rent, which we would have done except that Joan’s shoulder was bothering her enough that she was taking regular doses of ibuprofen. Thus, we decided on the boat tour.

We spent the rest of the day out on the boardwalk entertained by all of the widllife.

Okefenokee NWR —

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Alligator #1
Alligator #1
Little Blue Heron (juvenile)
Little Blue Heron (juvenile)
Alligator #2
Alligator #2
Alligator #3
Alligator #3
Cypress
Cypress
Squirrel
Squirrel
Alligators Piled High
Alligators Piled High
Great Egret #1
Great Egret #1
Great Egret #2
Great Egret #2
Great Egret with Prey
Great Egret with Prey
White Ibises (juvenile on right)
White Ibises (juvenile on right)
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-headed Woodpecker
White-tailed Deer
White-tailed Deer
Green Anole
Green Anole

Okefenokee Odes —

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ID Needed
ID Needed
Eastern Pondhawk (immature male or female)
Eastern Pondhawk (immature male or female)
Blue Dasher (immature male or female)
Blue Dasher (immature male or female)
ID Needed
ID Needed
Eastern Pondhawk (male, almost mature)
Eastern Pondhawk (male, almost mature)
Blue Dasher (male)
Blue Dasher (male)
ID Needed
ID Needed
Blue Dasher (male) #2
Blue Dasher (male) #2
ID Needed
ID Needed
Blue Corporal (male)
Blue Corporal (male)
Blue Corporal (female)
Blue Corporal (female)

We continued north on the 22nd, headed to Assateague National Seashore in Maryland, and camping enroute for a night in North Carolina. We spent the afternoon of the 23rd at the Virginia section of the National Seashore before heading to the campground in the Maryland section.

We spent the late afternoon/early evening of the 23rd as well as most of the day on the 24th exploring the various parts of Assateague before heading toward Lewes, Delaware where we were expected for dinner at our friend Sally’s house.

Assateague National Seashore —

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Laughing Gull #1
Laughing Gull #1
Laughing Gull #2
Laughing Gull #2
Bald Eagle with Food
Bald Eagle with Food
Bald Eagle (immature)
Bald Eagle (immature)
Red-winged Blackbird
Red-winged Blackbird
Great Egret #1
Great Egret #1
Herring Gull
Herring Gull
Great Egret #2
Great Egret #2
Moon Rise
Moon Rise
Assateague Horse #1
Assateague Horse #1
Assateague Horse #2
Assateague Horse #2

Sally and her boyfriend David showed us around the Lewes area, including stops at Cape Henlopen State Park and Prime Hook NWR.

Lewes, DE area —

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Last Year's Seed Heads
Last Year's Seed Heads
Chickadee Chin-ups
Chickadee Chin-ups
Brown Thrasher
Brown Thrasher

Sunday (the 27th) morning we headed home, arriving about 8 PM; just as it was getting dark.

We were glad to have made the trip and glad to be home!


Photo note: I made roughly 2500 photographs during the trip. I processed about ten percent of them and have presented 111 photos (approximately five percent) in the three blog posts. The large majority of the photographs were made with “Big Bertha” (i.e. my 600 mm lens); my 300 mm lens was used for a small minority. I think that I broke out a shorter lens only once… I guess that I was not “thinking” landscapes this trip!

 

Spring Break Road Trip, Part 2

Filed under: Birds,Spring,Wildlife — Frank @ 2:00 PM

On the 18th, we moved to a campsite on Pine Island. It is amazing how different two adjacent islands can be.

We spent both afternoons we were spent on Pine Island at Galt Nature Preserve (a tract preserved by Lee County). This small and out of the way preserve was very productive and definitely worth the visit.

Galt Nature Preserve —

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Black-crowned Night-Heron (juvenile)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (juvenile)
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Pileated Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Bald Eagles (adult and nestling) on Nest
Bald Eagles (adult and nestling) on Nest
ID Needed
ID Needed
ID Needed
ID Needed
Red-shouldered Hawk #2
Red-shouldered Hawk #2
Wood Stork
Wood Stork

On the 19th, we spent most of the day at Audubon’s Corkscrew Sanctuary on the western edge of the Everglades in the Naples area.

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Brown Anole
Brown Anole
Racoon
Racoon
Painted Bunting
Painted Bunting
Blueflag Iris
Blueflag Iris
Carolina Wren
Carolina Wren
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Turtle
Turtle
Anhinga
Anhinga

More to come…


 

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