Photographs by Frank

15 May 2019

Composites

Filed under: Autumn,Garden Flowers,Spring — Frank @ 12:05 PM

One day last week, Joan came home with a flat of pansies for her garden. I was struck by the amazing variety of different shapes and colors. I snipped off a few flowers (she will never notice!) and brought them in to my “studio” (i.e. the table in the basement). I photographed each flower individually and, after cleaning up the background a bit (pesky dust spots!), I composited the three frames using PhotoShop.

This image reminded me of a project I began last fall, but had not gotten past the “collect the specimen” stage. Last October I collected a number of fallen leaves and glycerinated* them. They have been sitting in a pile for months. After finishing the pansy composite, I was inspired to finally photograph this collection of leaves. The final images you see are, again, composites.

The grid image is what I had envisioned the seven or eight months ago when I collected the leaves.

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Pansies
Pansies
Three Autumn Leaves
Three Autumn Leaves
Maple Leaf Matrix
Maple Leaf Matrix

* Autumn leaves look very nice when you collect them but they are hard to photograph since they are not flat. One can press the leaves to get them flat, but, in my experience, they become brittle as they dry and thus hard to handle. They also do not stay flat for very long. Glycerination is the solution to the problem. By coating the leaves with glycerol and pressing the leaves between two glass plates one gets supple flat leaves that stay flat and therefore easier to photograph.

5 May 2019

Foggy Morning

Filed under: Landscapes,Monadnock Region,Spring — Frank @ 10:45 PM

This morning dawned cool and damp… par for the course around here these days.

I had a couple of hours to spare this morning so I headed out, cameras in tow, to see if I could find something to photograph.

Here are the results:

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Meetinghouse Hill #1
Meetinghouse Hill #1
Meetinghouse Hill #2
Meetinghouse Hill #2
Meetinghouse Hill #3
Meetinghouse Hill #3
Meetinghouse Hill #4
Meetinghouse Hill #4
Havoline
Havoline
Animals
Animals
Church, Hillsborough Center
Church, Hillsborough Center
Yellow
Yellow

28 April 2019

Showing Off For The Girls

Filed under: Birds,Monadnock Region,Spring,Wildlife — Frank @ 7:17 PM

Shortly after lunch today, I noticed a tom turkey and five hens meandering around our “front forty”.

The females were quite drab and practical. They spent ninety percent of the time foraging and pretty much ignored the tom.

The male on the other hand was splendid in his spring finery and strutted his stuff ninety percent of the time.

Of course, I spent ninety percent of the time with the camera focused on the male!

All of these photos were made through the glass of our storm door. These birds are way too wary to do anything else.

After about a half hour, they wandered around the garden, down the hill and out of sight.

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Showing Off #1
Showing Off #1
Showing Off #2
Showing Off #2
Showing Off #3
Showing Off #3
Showing Off #4
Showing Off #4
Showing Off #5
Showing Off #5
Showing Off #6
Showing Off #6

22 April 2019

Springtide in Maryland

Filed under: Landscapes,Spring — Frank @ 11:00 PM

Joan and I spent the past week in Maryland tending to my Mom after her second cataract operation. We left NH still in the grips of that drab in between season with ice still on the lake. Maryland, on the other hand, was to our eyes brilliant green with spring. We were about a week late for the cherry blossoms but the redbud trees were putting on a show which made up for the cherries.

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Vernal Tree #1
Vernal Tree #1
Vernal Tree #2
Vernal Tree #2
Sycamore #1
Sycamore #1
Pasture in Spring
Pasture in Spring
Vernal Tree #3
Vernal Tree #3
Redbuds
Redbuds
Vernal Foliage
Vernal Foliage
Sycamore #2
Sycamore  #2

Made with the camera obscura.

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Redbud #1
Redbud #1
Clubhouse
Clubhouse
Redbud #2
Redbud #2
Forsythia
Forsythia
Stable
Stable
Redbuds
Redbuds

12 June 2018

Lady Slippers

Filed under: Audubon Sanctuaries,Monadnock Region,Spring,wildflowers — Tags: — Frank @ 12:00 PM

Mid-June is peak season for lady slippers here in the Monadnock region.  These showy flowers are fairly rare and, at most sites where they grow, the number of individual plants is, in my experience, small. However, along the Mill Pond trail at New Hampshire Audubon’s Willard Pond Sanctuary there is a “grove” consisting of dozens of these plants in a relatively small area. Yesterday afternoon, I payed a visit to this wonderful spot to make a few photographs.

These flowers are growing under a relatively heavy canopy which creates dappled sunlight. I spent some time crawling around on my hands an knees looking for the right combination of light on a flower and relatively dark background. (All of these photos are in natural light.)

At one point during my crawl, I noticed how many of the leaves around are coated in pine pollen; as is my truck. (Mid-June is flowering time for our pine trees as well.) I took a short break from the flowers at one point when I noticed “nice light” on a pollen covered basswood leaf.

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Lady Slipper #1
Lady Slipper #1
Lady Slipper #2
Lady Slipper #2
Lady Slipper #3
Lady Slipper #3
Lady Slipper #4
Lady Slipper #4
Lady Slipper #5
Lady Slipper #5
Basswood Leaf with Pine Pollen
Basswood Leaf with Pine Pollen


 

10 June 2018

Four Species in Twelve Feet

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring,wildflowers — Tags: , — Frank @ 7:00 PM

During my walk this morning, I stopped at a sunny spot along a forest road to see what odes were present. Sunny spots in a wooded landscape are “hot spots” that concentrate odes.

The road is roughly eight feet wide and the sunny spot was roughly twelve feet long.

I was able to photograph four species of dragonflies in the small area: hudsonian whiteface, chalk-fronted corporal, racket-tailed emerald and one that I have not identified yet*. There were small numbers (3-6) individuals of the first two species and single individuals of the last two species in this small patch of sunlight.

As it was yesterday, chalk-fronted corporals were abundant along the road with small numbers of hudsonian whitefaces also present.

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Hudsonian Whiteface
Hudsonian Whiteface
Racket-tailed Emerald
Racket-tailed Emerald
Hudsomian Whiteface (maturing male)
Hudsomian Whiteface (maturing male)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #1
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #2
Immature Male Frosted Whiteface #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male) #2
Clover
Clover

* An immature male frosted whiteface. Thanks to Nick et al. from the NEOdes mailing list for the ID.


 

8 June 2018

Small Critters

This morning, after an absence of almost two weeks*, I took a walk up the unmaintained section of Brimstone Corner Road just to see what was around.

Ode-wise, the most common species were still the “early birds”… Hudsonian whitefaces (yellow individuals only) and chalk-fronted corporals (of both sexes). The numbers were small about six whitefaces and a dozen corporals in the three miles I walked.

I also observed a single brown-grey damselfly (probably a female bluet of some sort) and a female racket-tailed emerald.

There were a number of other small critters about. That is, besides the black flies and the mosquitoes (although neither of these were present in numbers large enough to be bothersome). I saw two red efts and a small (about the length of the first joint of my thumb) wood frog. Small numbers of at least three species of butterflies and one moth were also out and about.

Plant-wise, the spring ephemerals (trillium, etc.) are gone but a number of small summer flowers are in bloom or just about to open up.

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Hudsonian Whiteface
Hudsonian Whiteface
Red Eft
Red Eft
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male)
Chalk-fronted Corporal (male)
Wood Frog
Wood Frog
Chalk-fronted Corporal #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal #2
Chalk-fronted Corporal #3
Chalk-fronted Corporal #3
Butterfly #1
Butterfly #1
Wildflower
Wildflower
Moth
Moth
Butterfly #2
Butterfly #2
Racket-tailed Emerald
Racket-tailed Emerald

* I spent ten days in Maryland visiting my mother who is in a rehab facility after breaking both a wrist and a hip.


 

22 May 2018

Rainy Day Colors

Filed under: architecture,Garden Flowers,Monadnock Region,Spring — Tags: , — Frank @ 6:00 PM

After finishing my errands this morning, I took a stroll (with camera in hand) around downtown Peterborough in a light rain.

The light was dull and flat, it was not a day for black and white photos, but the rain did make the colors really pop!

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Blue Spokes
Blue Spokes
Once Blue
Once Blue
Spring Flower #1
Spring Flower #1
Spring Flower #2
Spring Flower #2
Colorful Detail #1
Colorful Detail #1
Colorful Detail #2
Colorful Detail #2
Colorful Detail #3`
Colorful Detail #3`
Colorful Detail #4
Colorful Detail #4
Fixed!
Fixed!
Traffic Cone
Traffic Cone
Flammable Gas
Flammable Gas
Life Is Good, Etc.
Life Is Good, Etc.


 

19 May 2018

Ode Season Progression

The ode season progresses.

The hudsonian whitefaces are maturing. Both males and females emerge with yellow and black markings. As the males mature the yellow spots turn red. Yesterday, about one in ten of the hudsonian whitefaces I saw were red or reddish.

Hudsonian whitefaces were still, by far, the most common ode around. However, small numbers of chalk-fronted corporals and brownish-grey damselflies (most probably a bluet of some sort) have appeared in the past few days.

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Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Hudsonian Whiteface (male)
Bluet (female)
Bluet (female)
Female Bluet with Prey
Female Bluet with Prey
Chalk-fronted Corporal
Chalk-fronted Corporal

While prowling the “neighborhood” with a camera set up to make close up photos of smallish insects, I often find other things to point my lens at… other insects (especially butterflies) and flowers (of both wild and garden ilk) are most common.

Yesterday, while I was kneeling near a stone wall stalking a chalk-fronted corporal, a chipmunk poked its head out from between two stones. He was a very curious “fellow”*. Every time I moved he would duck back into the crevice, but after a few seconds he would reappear. I was close enough to photograph him without taking the extension tube from between my camera and lens.

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Wild Strawberry Flowers
Wild Strawberry Flowers
Butterfly
Butterfly
Tulip with Visitor
Tulip with Visitor
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #1
Fancy Daffodils #2
Fancy Daffodils #2
Tulip
Tulip
Curious Chipmunk
Curious Chipmunk


* I say “fellow”, but I did not see enough of this individual to actually determine its sex.

13 May 2018

Ode Opener 2018

Filed under: Monadnock Region,Odontates,Spring — Tags: — Frank @ 9:00 PM

Over the past few days, I have been watching the appearance of increasing numbers of Hudsonian whitefaces in the yard and on the road. There were a scattered few last Monday. Today, there were dozens. (Today, I also observed, but did not identify or photograph, a single damselfly.)

Hooray… Ode season is upon us!!!

This afternoon, I dusted off the ode rig and spent a bit of time brushing up on my ode photography skills. Those skills were rusty, but the kinks worked themselves out quickly.

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Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #1
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #2
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #3
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #4
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #5
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #6
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #7
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #8
Hudsonian Whiteface #9
Hudsonian Whiteface #9


 

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