Photographs by Frank

18 October 2013

Two More Stone Arch Bridges

Filed under: Autumn,Landscapes,Monadnock Region — Tags: , — Frank @ 9:00 AM

There are five stone arch bridges of historical import nearby our house. I photographed and wrote about the nearest, the now unused, one in Stoddard (near the Antrim line) a couple of days ago. The other bridges are all located in Hillsborough.

On Wednesday, I set out to explore two of the other bridges… the Jones Rd. bridge (sometimes called the Carr Bridge) and the Gleason Falls bridge. Both of these bridges are still in active use and span Beard Brook. They (and a third bridge, the Gleason Falls Road bridge) are all located within a mile of each other.

If you are keeping count, I have mentioned four of the five bridges. The fifth is the Sawyer bridge also located in Hillsborough. This bridge used to carry US202 across the Contoocook River near the junction with NH 9, but now sits unused next to its modern replacement. ┬áThis bridge had a brief moment in the spotlight during the last presidential campaign as Romney’s “Bridge to Nowhere”.

I’ll need to get back to photograph the Gleason Falls Road bridges at some point and maybe I should also do the Sawyer’s Bridge for the record, but it is not in a particularly photogenic spot.

Anyway, here are the photos from Wednesday:

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Jones Rd. Bridge from Upstream
Jones Rd. Bridge from Upstream
Jones Rd. Bridge from Downstream
Jones Rd. Bridge from Downstream
Gleason Falls Bridge from Downstream
Gleason Falls Bridge from Downstream
Gleason Falls Bridge from Upstream
Gleason Falls Bridge from Upstream
Gleason Falls (upper)
Gleason Falls (upper)
Gleason Falls (middle)
Gleason Falls (middle)
Gleason Falls (lower)
Gleason Falls (lower)

When I spend time around running water, I can’t help but be fascinated by the patterns present in the flow. Thus, I often spend time making photos of the water with long shutter speeds (4-8 seconds in the photos shown here).

The results can be quite abstract and I helped that along with my processing.

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Flow #1
Flow #1
Flow #2
Flow #2
Flow #3
Flow #3
Flow #4
Flow #4
Flow #5
Flow #5

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